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David Willsey

 

Lesson Plans: Nov. 15th- 17th

This week Wed.-Thursday: Each Class will review last weeks work and will catch up students that were absent.

 

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Assessments: Oral , written(essay, short answers etc) Testing- MChoice, fill in blank, Matching etc.

1st Hour World History and 6th Hour

Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770 

Muslim: Basic Tenants- Beliefs- Rise of Islam in Middle East and North Africa

We will focus on Dimension 2 questions: Dimension 3 – Sources and Evidence

4. Gather relevant information from multiple perspectives and a variety of sources; evaluate the credibility of the source by determining its relevance and intended use

5. Use evidence from multiple sources to answer compelling and supporting questions by developing arguments with claims and counterclaims and providing explanations

 

Monday- Tuesday  No School

Wed.- Review Islam beliefs.  Get students caught up as a group.

 Thursday: World map of where Islam is located. And review for Test on Islam.

Friday- Test on World Trade.

 

 

2nd  Hour   US History:

Continue our study of Americas Entrance to WW I and how it is still affecting us today.

Monday- Tuesday  No School

Lesson 1: United States Entry into World War I: Two Diametrically Opposed Views

Guiding Questions:

What important events led to U.S. involvement in World War I?

What is the most compelling evidence explaining why the U.S. entered World War I?

 

Themes::

  1.  American foreign policy continues to resonate with the issues involved in the entry of the United States into World War I—
  2. unilateralism versus foreign alliances, the responsibilities of power, the influence of the military-industrial complex on foreign policy, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals.
  1. .Understanding the choices the Wilson administration made and their consequences provides insight into international affairs in the years since the end of the Great War and beyond.

Objectives;

  • In this lesson, students reconsider the events leading to U.S. entry into World War I through the lens of archival documents.
  • List important events leading to U.S. involvement in World War I.
  • Take a stand on a hypothesis for U.S. entry into World War I, supported by specific evidence.

 

Wed.- Finish the narrative of World War I. The Causes and results.

Focus on: Nationalism, Imperialism, Alliances and Militarism

Thursday- Review the causes and class review for test on Friday.

 

Made the war very costly in lives.  Review for test on Germany’s actions to push America into the war.

Friday: Test

 

3rd Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday- Tuesday  No School

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Lesson Plans: Nov. 6th- 10th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Assessments: Oral , written(essay, short answers etc) Testing- MChoice, fill in blank, Matching etc.

1st Hour World History and 6th Hour

Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770 

We will focus on Dimension 2 questions: Dimension 3 – Sources and Evidence

4. Gather relevant information from multiple perspectives and a variety of sources; evaluate the credibility of the source by determining its relevance and intended use

5. Use evidence from multiple sources to answer compelling and supporting questions by developing arguments with claims and counterclaims and providing explanations

We will finish the lesson on the affect of the silk road on the world. Review Monday and take test on Tuesday.

Wed. We will see the affects of world travel on the world and the desire for an easier way than the Silk road.

Thursday: Explore the rise of Mercantilism in the European countries.

Friday- Test on World Trade.

 

Lesson: The Silk Road and Ancient Trade:

 

Theme:

Silk Road didn’t begin trade, but it did radically expand its scope, and the connections that were formed by mostly unknown merchants arguably changed the world more than any political or religious leaders.

Objectives: Students will learn the following.

  1. Where was it?
  2. How did it get its name?
  3. What is the influence of the Silk Road?
  4. How it changed the world.

We will use a variety of teaching methods for this lesson.  Introduction of the Silk road, lecture and video.

Handouts: A written prospective on the silk road, map and video on the role of its influence on world history.

 

 

 

 

2nd  Hour   US History:

Continue our study of Americas Entrance to WW I and how it is still affecting us today.

Monday- Review Wilson’s reasons for going to war and the opposition it brought forth.

Review for test Tuesday.

Tuesday- Test on America’s pre war reasons for and against war.

Lesson 1: United States Entry into World War I: Two Diametrically Opposed Views

Guiding Questions:

What important events led to U.S. involvement in World War I?

What is the most compelling evidence explaining why the U.S. entered World War I?

 

Themes::

  1.  American foreign policy continues to resonate with the issues involved in the entry of the United States into World War I—
  2. unilateralism versus foreign alliances, the responsibilities of power, the influence of the military-industrial complex on foreign policy, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals.
  1. .Understanding the choices the Wilson administration made and their consequences provides insight into international affairs in the years since the end of the Great War and beyond.

Objectives;

  • In this lesson, students reconsider the events leading to U.S. entry into World War I through the lens of archival documents.
  • List important events leading to U.S. involvement in World War I.
  • Take a stand on a hypothesis for U.S. entry into World War I, supported by specific evidence.

 

Wed.- Thursday- Actions of Germany that lead to America coming into war, and the new technology that

Made the war very costly in lives.  Review for test on Germany’s actions to push America into the war.

Friday: Test

 

Lesson Plans: Oct. 30th-Nov. 3rd

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Assessments: Oral , written(essay, short answers etc) Testing- MChoice, fill in blank, Matching etc.

1st Hour World History and 6th Hour

Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770 

We will focus on Dimension 2 questions: Dimension 3 – Sources and Evidence

4. Gather relevant information from multiple perspectives and a variety of sources; evaluate the credibility of the source by determining its relevance and intended use

5. Use evidence from multiple sources to answer compelling and supporting questions by developing arguments with claims and counterclaims and providing explanations

Lesson: The Silk Road and Ancient Trade:

 

Theme:

Silk Road didn’t begin trade, but it did radically expand its scope, and the connections that were formed by mostly unknown merchants arguably changed the world more than any political or religious leaders.

Objectives: Students will learn the following.

  1. Where was it?
  2. How did it get its name?
  3. What is the influence of the Silk Road?
  4. How it changed the world.

We will use a variety of teaching methods for this lesson.  Introduction of the Silk road, lecture and video.

Handouts: A written prospective on the silk road, map and video on the role of its influence on world history.

Monday- Tuesday

Students will become familiar with the geography of the silk road and how it influenced the history.

Will read about the development of the road. Watch a short video on the Silk Road.

Wed.- Thursday

Students will learn of the legacy of the Silk Road.

Friday:

Test

 

 

 

 

2nd  Hour   US History:

Lesson 1: United States Entry into World War I: Two Diametrically Opposed Views

Guiding Questions:

What important events led to U.S. involvement in World War I?

What is the most compelling evidence explaining why the U.S. entered World War I?

 

Themes::

  1.  American foreign policy continues to resonate with the issues involved in the entry of the United States into World War I—

2.    unilateralism versus foreign alliances, the responsibilities of power, the influence of the military-industrial complex on foreign policy, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals.

3      .Understanding the choices the Wilson administration made and their consequences provides insight into international affairs in the years since the end of the Great War and beyond.

Objectives;

  • In this lesson, students reconsider the events leading to U.S. entry into World War I through the lens of archival documents.
  • List important events leading to U.S. involvement in World War I.
  • Take a stand on a hypothesis for U.S. entry into World War I, supported by specific evidence.

 

Monday- Tuesday-

Read and review primary documents. Wilson’s second Inaugural address. Students will read and analyze his position on world affairs.

Document on resistance to the move to war.

Wed. – Outline the causes of America’s going to war.

Thursday- Review of the Inaugural address and the causes of the war and Americas entrance.  Test Friday.

Test: On entering WW I.

 

 

3rd Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Oct. 23rd- 27th Lesson Plans

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Assessments: Oral , written(essay, short answers etc) Testing- MChoice, fill in blank, Matching etc.

In each class we will:

1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

2. Develop supporting questions that contribute to inquiry: identifying facts, concepts, and interpretations

3. Answer compelling and supporting questions using appropriate and available sources that consider multiple points of view

1st and 6th Hour Pre AP World History

Each Era of World History will follow the standards set by the College Board.

This weeks Era is: Foundations – 600 CE

Emphasis on Roman Empire: With Specific Attention to the Rise of Christianity

We will be using handouts, lecture, study questions, oral question, video and individual study to

Learn the material.

Monday-Thursday teaching the following materials, with test on Friday.

TEACHING PROCEDURE    

Each day will use the flow chart of information with enrichment and essential questions to be asked as the

Information is given. Students will take notes on each aspect of the flow chart.

 

Students will : Will study the Course Themes and Periods For AP World History:

 

Students will aquire knowledge of each World Era by using the Pre AP World History course guidlines:

 

Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment

Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures

Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict

Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems

Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

 

Monday- Introduction to the Hebrews and their influence on World History of Old and modern history.

Handout on the development of Hebrew thought and culture.

Tuesday- Their influence on the culture at large,

Wed.- How Monotheism was their greatest contribution to world religions.

Thursday- The conflict in world history between the Hebrews and the rest of Middle East.

 

The United States in a World at War, 1914-1917

Standards: Era 7: Emergence of Modern America 1890-1930

1.Students will evaluate the territorial expansion and foreign policy of the United States between 1890 and 1930.

2.Students will evaluate social, economic, and political changes in the United States between 1890 and 1930.

 

Era7.1.USH.2

            Evaluate social, economic, and political motives for and impact of the involvement of the United States in World War I using multiple primary and secondary sources

 

 

Essential Questions:

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After you read and analyze this chapter, you should be able to:

1.     Explain Wilson’s major foreign policy choices and how he sought to establish new directions in international relations.

2.     Describe Wilson’s expectations regarding American neutrality and what constraints he faced in his efforts to maintain neutrality.

3.     Analyze the choices the federal government made in mobilizing the economy and society in support of the war and how the war affected Americans.

4.     Indicate why Wilson chose to keep the American Expeditionary Force as separate as possible from the troops of the other Allies.

5.     Explain Wilson’s expectations regarding peace and the constraints he faced in realizing those objectives. Explain the choices Wilson made at Versailles, evaluate the outcome of those choices, and describe what kept the Senate from supporting the peace treaty.

6.     Analyze the change in Americans’ expectations as a result of the outcome of the war and the events of 1919 and explain how it affected their choice in the 1920 presidential election.

CHAPTER Notes

 

Monday- Tuesday: Monday handout of Wilson’s first address to the Congress and Nation. Set forth his ideas for his presidency. Will read as class and reflect on how it is similar to today’s problems.

 

I.      Inherited Commitments and New Directions, 1913-1917

A.    Anti-Imperialism, Intervention, and Arbitration

1.     Congress established a bill of rights for Filipinos in 1917 and promised them future independence, while Puerto Rico became a U.S. territory the next year and its residents became U.S. citizens.

2.     The Bryan-Chamorro Treaty (1914) gave the United States significant concessions in Nicaragua, including the right to build a canal.

3.     Haiti became a protectorate in 1915, and American forces controlled most of the government until 1933.

4.     Wilson sent marines to the Dominican Republic in 1916; they maintained a presence there until 1924.

5.     Although Wilson made few changes in previous policies regarding the Caribbean, he enthusiastically encouraged efforts by Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan to promote arbitration of international disputes, and these negotiations produced 30 treaties.

 

 

B.     Wilson and the Mexican Revolution

1.     Huerta took control of the Mexican government in 1913 and had Madero executed.

2.     Wilson considered Huerta a murderer and vowed “not to recognize a government of butchers.”

3.     Wilson thus presented a new moral dimension to U.S. diplomatic recognition—governments must rest on the consent of the governed.

4.     Wilson found an excuse to intervene in April 1914 in Veracruz, the leading Mexican port, after American soldiers were arrested in Tampico.

5.     Huerta fled Mexico in mid-July, and Wilson withdrew the last American forces from Veracruz in November 1914.

6.     Carranza succeeded Huerta as president, and Wilson officially recognized his government.

7.     Pancho Villa, another rebel leader, decided that his best hope to take power from Carranza was to incite war between the U.S. and Mexican governments. He led a raid across the border and killed Americans in Columbus, New Mexico, in 1916.

a)     Wilson sent a punitive expedition, led by John J. Pershing, into Mexico to capture Villa. It wasunsuccessful, and the troops withdrew from Mexico as the United States was drawn into World War I.

 

Wed. –Thursday: Students will learn that America did not first go to war in Europe and how Wilson won a second election on the stand he kept us out of war. Then how America was brought into the war.

II.     The United States in a World at War, 1914-1917

A.    The Great War in Europe

1.     Since 1871, competition for world markets and colonies encouraged nations to accumulate arms and seek allies.

2.     The Triple Entente linked Britain, France, and Russia, while the Triple Alliance linked Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy.

3.     The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand at Sarajevo occurred in the midst of an arms race between rival alliances and rising nationalist tensions.

B.     American Neutrality

1.     Wilson announced that the United States was not committed to either side and was to be accorded all neutral rights, but his hopes for peace proved unrealistic.

a)     Most warring nations wanted additional territory, and only a decisive victory could deliver such a prize.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday:  Test on Wilson’s political vision and how we got into WWI.

3rd Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

Oct. 16th- 20th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Assessments: Oral , written(essay, short answers etc) Testing- MChoice, fill in blank, Matching etc.

In each class we will:

1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

2. Develop supporting questions that contribute to inquiry: identifying facts, concepts, and interpretations

3. Answer compelling and supporting questions using appropriate and available sources that consider multiple points of view

 

 

1st and 6th Hour Pre Ap World Histor

 Overview

The diverse geography of the Americas resulted in the emergence of many varied and highly advanced civilizations. Some of these early civilizations were wiped out by diseases introduced to the Americas by European expeditions.

 

ANCIENT AMERICA

 

Topic 6:  Meso and South American Civilizations                                                                                                                                               

World History      Pre AP

 (Standard 1:  Identify and analyze the historical, social, and cultural contexts of the arts)

 

                                (Standard 2: Respond Critically and aesthetically to various works in the arts)

 

                                (Standard 3: Understand how transportation, trade, communication, science and technology influence the progression and regression of cultures)

 

Students will be able to asses the objectives below.

 

Monday and tuesday: Introduction and handouts

Analyze the legacies of the Olmec, Zapotec, and Chavin on later Meso and South American civilizations.                                     

 

Locate major civilizations of Mesoamerica and Andean South America.                                                                                                                                                                  

 

WEd. and Thursday: notes on the following information.

Describe the roles of people in the Maya, Inca, and Aztec societies.                                                                                                                                                                  

 

Compare the key economic, cultural, and political characteristics of the major civilizations of Meso and South America.                                                                                                                                                                   

 

Determine the impact of significant Meso and South American rulers such as Pacal the Great, Moctezuma I, and Huayna Capac.

 

Essential Content:

·          The Legacy of Early Civilizations

 

·          Chavin:  Andes,  Religious Vessels, Cultural Achievements

·          Olmec:  Mexican Civilization, Stone Heads

·          Incas: Machu Pichu, Quippi, Forced labor, Gold/Silver

·          Aztecs: Tenochitlan, Lake Texcoco

·          Mayas:  Writing-glyphs,  Yucatan Peninsula 

·          The Economy of the Americas: Chinampas

·          Political Systems of the Americas: Kingdom vs. Empire

·          Cultural Characteristics of the Americas: Sacrifice, Math and Science

 

TEST Friday.

 

2nd Hour American History

 

WOODROW WILSON AND FOREIGN POLICY

Lesson "To Elect Good Men": Woodrow Wilson and Latin America

 

Guiding Question

How did the Wilson administration respond to revolution and civil unrest in Latin America?

Learning Objectives

  • Identify American economic and strategic interests in the Western Hemisphere
  • Explain how the U.S attempted to safeguard American economic interests and promote democratic reforms in Latin America during Wilson's presidency
  • Discuss how U.S. actions reflected Wilson's foreign policy principles and racial beliefs of the era
  • Explain why many Latin Americans resented or resisted U.S. actions

 

Assessment Goals

After completing this lesson, students should be able to answer, orally or in writing, these questions:

  • Why did the U.S. intervene militarily in Mexico and Haiti? (How are these reasons similar and/or different to the ones you provided for question 5 on the map exercise worksheet?)
  • On what principles did Wilson justify these actions?
  • How did Mexicans and Haitians respond to American actions?
  • It has been said that despite his intentions and idealistic pronouncements, Wilson's foreign policy in Latin America was just an extension of Teddy Roosevelt's 'big stick' policy. Do you agree? Why or why not?

Students should be able to identify and explain the significance of the following:

  • Robert Lansing
  • Victoriano Huerta
  • Venustiano Carranza
  • Tampico

 

 

Lesson Activities

Monday and Tuesday: Introduction and activity 1
Activity 1. U.S. Interests in Latin America

In the first exercise, students will use an interactive map to learn about U.S. actions in Central America and the Caribbean, from the late 1890s through the 1930s. By clicking on Cuba, for example, students will learn that the United States sent troops to the island nation on three separate occasions. Using the worksheet on page 1 of the Text Document, students will then answer a set of questions that will allow them to discover the extent of U.S. involvement.

 

 

Wed. and Thursday Activity 2 and 3

Activity 2. U.S. Intervention in the Mexican Revolution

The second activity will focus on American intervention in the Mexican Revolution. Students will use one secondary source and several primary sources, including photographs, to do the following exercises (see Text Document for further guidance):

Students will first examine photographs in the online exhibition of Robert Runyon's photographs of the Mexican Revolution, accessible via the EDSITEment-reviewed American Memory Project, to make a list answering this question:

"What sort of problems did the revolution appear to cause for the people of Mexico?"

worksheet for this purpose is available on page 2 of the Text Document.

After making this list, students will learn about the 1914 Tampico incident, which led to U.S. military intervention in Mexico. After visiting the following two sites, students will answer a series of questions, which can be found on page 3 of the Text Document. Pages 4-5 of the Text Document contain an excerpt of Wilson's statement.

Students will next break into groups and adopt historical roles in order to better understand why the U.S. intervened in Mexico's revolution and how President Venustiano Carranza responded. Using primary sources, each group will prepare a presentation explaining important issues, which are detailed on the Text Document. Group 1 will be Carranza; Group 2 will be Secretary of State Robert Lansing justifying U.S intervention to Wilson; Group 3 will also be Lansing, in this case, justifying U.S. intervention to Carranza. A presentation evaluation rubric is provided for teacher use on page 12 of the Text Document.

After all the groups have presented, lead an in-class discussion focusing on the following questions:

  1. What were the most convincing reasons for the sending of American forces into Mexico?
  2. In what ways does U.S. intervention demonstrate "Wilsonianism," as defined in the previous lesson?
  3. Were there any inconsistencies in the American justifications for invading Mexico?
  4. Why did Carranza appeal to Argentina, Brazil, and Chile?
Activity 3. U.S. Intervention in Haiti

In the third exercise, students will adopt the role of an American news correspondent in Haiti in 1920. Their task is to write a brief article answering one of these two questions:

  1. How have the Haitians responded to the presence of U.S. Marines in their country?
  2. What do many of the Americans in Haiti think of Haitians, and how do they (Americans) treat them (Haitians)?

They will use the following documents (excerpted on pages 13-24 of the Text Document) as sources for their article:

 

Test Friday:

 

 

 

Oct. 9th – 13th Lesson Plans

 

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Assessments: Oral , written(essay, short answers etc) Testing- MChoice, fill in blank, Matching etc.

In each class we will:

1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

2. Develop supporting questions that contribute to inquiry: identifying facts, concepts, and interpretations

3. Answer compelling and supporting questions using appropriate and available sources that consider multiple points of view

1st and 6th Hour Pre AP World History

Each Era of World History will follow the standards set by the College Board.

This weeks Era is: Foundations – 600 CE

Emphasis on Roman Empire: With Specific Attention to the Rise of Christianity

We will be using handouts, lecture, study questions, oral question, video and individual study to

Learn the material.

Monday-Thursday teaching the following materials, with test on Friday.

TEACHING PROCEDURE    

Each day will use the flow chart of information with enrichment and essential questions to be asked as the

Information is given. Students will take notes on each aspect of the flow chart.

 

Students will : Will study the Course Themes and Periods For AP World History:

 

Students will aquire knowledge of each World Era by using the Pre AP World History course guidlines:

 

Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment

Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures

Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict

Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems

Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

Objective: Providing that a student understands that we read and write frequently and that there is a high emphasis on independent work, students will become better thinkers, better writers, and better readers.  In addition, students will also have the ability to practice skills needed for AP  based courses in the future.

Rome and the Rise of Christianity

The Development of Christianity 
Roman religion worshipped many gods and goddesses. Romans were initially tolerant of other religions. By 6 A.D., there was widespread unrest in Judaea about Roman rule. Christianity emerged at a time of widespread unrest in the Roman province of Judaea. Christianity began as a religious movement within Judaism which spread following Jesus' death. By 100 A.D. Christian churches were established in many major cities of the empire. Romans, despite a history of tolerance of many religions, viewed Christianity as a threat to the state, and Christians often faced persecution. In the fourth century, the emperor Constantine proclaimed official tolerance of Christianity, setting the stage for its stage for its adoption as the empire's official religion under Theodosius the Great.

Clergy,  Simon Peter,   Jesus,   procurator,   Judaea,    New Testament,    Aegean Sea,    Jerusalem,

Laity,      Constantine,   Theodosius the Great,         Paul.

 

Originally, Christianity was a small, unorganized sect that promised personal salvation after death. Salvation was possible through belief in Jesus as the son of God—the same God the Jews believed in. Early Christians debated whether they should only preach to Jews, or if non-Jews could become Christians, too. Eventually, Christianity gained followers not only from Jewish communities, but from throughout the Roman world.

  1. Stop and consider: How might the fact that Christianity developed out of Judaism have affected its spread?

Christianity and Rome

In the decades after Jesus's death, the Apostle Paul wrote many letters that are now part of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. Paul was a Roman citizen and sent these letters to small communities of Christians living throughout the Roman Empire. The letters show us that Paul and his fellow Christians were still figuring out exactly what being a Christian meant. Issues related to the exact relationship between Judaism and Christianity, and between Christianity and the Roman government, were prominent topics of discussion.

  1. Stop and consider: What do Paul's letters tell us about Christianity in the mid-first century CE?

Christianity was fully formed as a new religion at this time

Christianity was well-established as a major religion in the Roman Empire

Judaism had received the status of a legal religion in the Roman Empire with formal protections. Although Christianity developed out of Jewish traditions, it had no such legal protections. Christians were occasionally persecuted—formally punished—for their beliefs during the first two centuries CE. But the Roman state’s official position was generally to ignore Christians unless they clearly challenged imperial authority.

Rome becomes Christian

In 313 CE, the emperor Constantine issued the Edict of Milan, which granted Christianity—as well as most other religions—legal status. While this was an important development in the history of Christianity, it was not a total replacement of traditional Roman beliefs with Christianity.

In 325, Constantine called the Council of Nicaea, which was a gathering of Christian leaders to determine the formal—or orthodox—beliefs of Christianity. The result of this council was the Nicene Creed, which laid out the agreed upon beliefs of the council.

In 380 CE, the emperor Theodosius issued the Edict of Thessalonica, which made Christianity, specifically Nicene Christianity, the official religion of the Roman Empire. Most other Christian sects were deemed heretical, lost their legal status, and had their properties confiscated by the Roman state.

  1. Stop and consider: How did the Roman Empire shape early Christianity?

The Roman Empire did not become Christianized overnight. Roman religious beliefs changed slowly over time. At the time the Western Roman Empire fell in 476 CE, Christianity was still spreading. It is also important to remember that Christianity itself did not appear suddenly or fully-formed. Christianity grew out of Jewish traditions and was shaped by Roman cultural and political structures for several centuries.

To take one lasting example, the head of the Roman Catholic Church—the Pope—takes his title from the old Roman office of pontifex maximus—the high priest. Roman culture was not wholly replaced, but was often repurposed as it came into contact with other peoples and cultures.

Christianity was deeply influenced by both Judaism and Roman cultural institutions. We can't fully understand the development of the Christian religion without putting it into these contexts!

 

 

Lesson Plans: Mr. Willsey Sept. 18th- 22nd

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Higher learning : Skills and application      Content Standards.  Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770      

                1.            Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the first global age. 

Dimension 1 – Questions   1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

Dimension 2    1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

2. Develop supporting questions that contribute to inquiry: identifying facts, concepts, and interpretations

3. Answer compelling and supporting questions using appropriate and available sources that consider multiple points of view

1st and 6th Hour World History: Ancient Greece:

Monday and Tuesday:

  1. Greek Vocabulary:
  2. Essential Questions:

3.How geography affects a nation.

4. How Greek Culture is the basis for Western Civilization

Beginnings of Self government and role of city states.

Greek Geography

  • Greece was divided into small self-governing communities (city-states or polis).  
  • The main reason for this was the geography of the region:  islands and valleys cut off by the sea or mountains.
  • Warrior aristocracies developed with main centers in Athens, Sparta, Corinth, Delphi, and Thebes.
  • Each city-state controlled smaller areas and over time inter-city rivalry would give way to war between city-states.

Ancient Greece

  • Geography prevented political unification
    • Culturally unified
  • City-States
    • Cities offered safety and wealth
    • Different political systems
  • Unified when threatened
    • Persian Wars
  • Wars weaken city-states
    • Peloponnesian War (431-404 BCE)

Wed.- Thursday- Fall of Persia and rise of Greece.

How their battles affect modern culture today And how their Culture affects us today in all areas.

Battle at Marathon

  • Darius sent a Persian fleet across the Aegean Sea to city of Marathon
  • Persians waited for the Athenians, but the Athenians were outnumbered and didn’t move

 

Battle at Marathon

  • Persians decided to attack Athens directly
    • Loaded cavalry & infantry on ships and went north to Athens
    • Athens decides to strike
    • Athens sends foot soldiers to attack Persian troops while they are in shallow water waiting to board ships
  • Persians were caught off guard and lost to the Greeks in this battle
  •  

The 300

  • At Thermopylae – 7,000 Greeks led by King Leonidas stood firm for 3 days
  • Greek traitor showed Persians a trail they could use to attack the Greeks
    • They lost, but gave Themistocles time to carry out his plan at sea

Greek Arts

  • Myron = one of Greece’s greatest sculptors
    • Sculpted what he thought people SHOULD look like
    • Sculpted the “Discus Thrower”
  • Drama and Theater
  • Greeks = 1st to write and perform plays
  • Earliest Greek plays = tragedies
    • Had unhappy endings after main character struggled against the fates
    • Aeschylus = Greek tragedy writer who wrote 90 plays

 

Sophocles

  • General in Athenian army
  • Wrote tragedies
  • Accepted human suffering as an unavoidable part of life
  • Wrote Oedipus Rex = deals with King Oedipus’s struggle to beat the fates, but he can’t win against them

 

Euripedes

  • Wrote tragedies
  • Hated war and his plays often showed the misery of war
  • Focused on human behavior that brought disaster
  • Comedies
  • Had humorous plots and happy endings
  • Aristophanes = most famous writer of Greek comedies

 

 

 

The Olympic Games

  • Ancient Greeks stressed athletics in school
  • Greek men often spent their afternoons exercising
  • Olympic games were held every 4 years in Olympia
  • To honor Zeus
  • Fighting and trade stopped

 

The Olympic Games

  • Only males were able to participate
  • Women weren’t even allowed to watch
  • Greek women had their own games honoring Hera

 

The Olympic Games

  • Individual, not team, events
    • Footrace, broad jump, discus throwing, boxing, wrestling, pentathlon
  • Winners = crowned with olive leaves; parades held in their honor
  • Olympic athletes often given special privileges, like not having to pay taxes

 

Friday a test  on Greek Vocabulary:

2nd Hour Am. History:    The Progressive Era:

Standards: Era 7: Emergence of Modern America 1890-1930       

1.Students will evaluate the territorial expansion and foreign policy of the United States between 1890 and 1930.

2.Students will evaluate social, economic, and political changes in the United States between 1890 and 1930.

Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic effects of acquiring new territories on the development of the United States (e.g., Spanish-American War, annexation of Hawaii)

Focus: Teddy Roosevelt:  His influence on the culture of America. We will read some of his works and review the extent of his life. And how it affected his view of government and the individual.

The role of Progressivism: Focus on TR.

Monday-  Tuesday

  1. His extent as a reformer in the Progressive sense.
    1. His Square Deal
    2. Support human welfare
    3. Clean up gov.
    4. Regulate business
  2. His attempts to clean up gov.
    1. Using the Civil Service Commission to regulate gov. jobs, not political rewards/

Wed. – Thursday:

  1. His push to control Industrialization: Particularly Labor.
  2. Reigning in corporate power.
    1. Support workers rights and womens suffrage
    2. Became know as trust buster.
  • PE
  • MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance
  • Monday: Class room rules and procedures
  • Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.
  • Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 
  • Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball
  • Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.
  • Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: Sept. 11th-15th

1st and  2nd   World History:

Monday- Documents 6 and 7 on Columbian exchange. Read and answer questions on another sheet of paper.

Tuesday- Class discussion of Columbian exchange and mercantilism Review for Test Wed.

Wed.- Test on Columbian exchange and mercantilism

 

Thursday and Friday: Class will review and analyze:

IX. Cultural and Intellectual Developments

                A. Cultural/Intellectual thought before 1450

                                1. Life before

                                                a. Dominated by Christianity for 1000 years

                                                b. Feudal system dominated political/social structure for 500 years

                                                                i. Dominated by concern for local issues

                                                                                a. salvation

                                                                                b. territorial disputes

                                                                                c. Black Death

                                                                                d. lack of education outside monasteries

                                                                                e. small-scale trade

                                                c. Greece/Rome essentially forgotten

                                2. What influenced shift

                                                a. Crusades exposed Christians to advanced Islamic Civilization

                                                b. Countries unified under centralized world

                                                c. Increased trade fueled contacts with other worlds

                                                d. Universities became centers of learning

                                                e. Scholasticism – exposed to rest of world and Europe’s past

                                                f. Byzantine and Islamic empires preserved the past

                                                                i. added to knowledge of math and science

3. Four major movements – Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment

4. Shift in thought

a. No longer backward, isolated, self-involved region on edge of major civilizations

b. the dominant civilization in the world

c. shift in exploration and expansion caused and caused by shifts in thought

d. Not quick, broad or in equal proportions

                i. long time to penetrate into all circles

                ii. people with power jealously guarded it

                iii. peasant class didn’t participate

                                a. not educated

                                b. not in position to learn about

 

 

2nd Hour  American History

THE PROGRESSIVE ERA TO THE NEW ERA, 1900-1929

We should not accept social life as it has “trickled down to us,” the young journalist Walter Lippmann wrote soon after the twentieth century began. “We have to deal with it deliberately, devise its social organization, . . . educate and control it.” The ambition to harness and organize the energies of modern life of which Lippmann spoke cut through American economy, politics, and society in many different, sometimes contradictory ways between 1900 and 1929, but it left virtually none of its major institutions unchanged. The modern business corporation, modern politics, the modern presidency, a modern vision of the international order, and modern consumer capitalism were all born in these years

 

Monday- outline the paper on Progressive Era

Tuesday- Discuss the Progressive Era and its contradiction and rise from the Imperialist of the early 1900.

And review for test on Anti Imperialism.

Wed.- Test on Anti Imperialism and Progressivism

-Thursday-Friday

  Asking and answering  American Essential Questions: In depth look at Teddy Roosevelt

 

PROGRESSIVE ERA TO NEW ERA, 1900-1929

https://www.gilderlehrman.org/sites/default/files/imagecache/inline-2col-float/content-images/tr_gli.pngThe following question will be discussed after reading some of the works of TR

To what extent was Theodore Roosevelt a “Progressive” president?

 

3rd Hour PE  and 8th Hour PE (Elementary)

Lesson plans will be adjusted for Elem.

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Mr. Willsey’s Lesson Plans:

We will use a variety of teaching methods. Follow 504 and other student modifications.  

 

Lesson Plans Sept. 5th- 8th

1st and 6th Hour World History

Standards: Era 6: Students will analyze the first transformation and innovations of the first global age.

Monday- Labor Day

Tuesday- Review last weeks lessons on the start of World History in 1450. How the rest of World History was influenced by the past.  We will review materials and take test on Tuesday.

Wed. – How Western Civilization, began to take control of the world commerce and became the military power, dominated the seas, trade and became economic powers.

Thursday- How knowledge of the past, renewed the discovery of the future. How inventions lead to discovery of new lands and a new world and a change of the old world.

Friday- How the change in all of the factors, lead to the changes in politics and rapid development of the world.

 

 

2nd Hour American History

This week will read and analyze the Anti-Imperialist, continue with the world Imperialism of America and Europe in China and the rest of Asia. The rise of Japan its expansion and conflict with Russia.  

American Imperialism: Era 7: Standards: American Foreign policy and rise of American as a world power.

Monday- Labor Day

Tuesday- Test Review American History from 1890-1900’s. How America begin world Imperialism with the taking of Cuba from Spain and also the Philippines. Will review how the US  joined the rest of the world and begin world wide imperialistic attitudes.

Wed.- The contradiction of American Progressives, and its leader Teddy Roosevelt over the treatment of the Filipino people. 

Thursday- The Rise of the Anti- Imperialism league and the debate over the Constitution protections, and its place in the Imperialistic age.

Friday- How China became a world wide conflict with many European nations in China,  and John Hay pushing the American policy of Open Door to the trade with China.

Mr. Willsey’s Lesson Plans:

We will use a variety of teaching methods. Follow 504 and other student modifications.  

PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Mr. Willsey’s Lesson Plans:

We will use a variety of teaching methods. Follow 504 and other student modifications.  

 

Lesson Plans August 28th – Sept. 3rd

1st and 6th Hour World History

Monday- Review last weeks lessons on the start of World History in 1450. How the rest of World History was influenced by the past.  We will review materials and take test on Tuesday.

Tuesday- Test

Wed. – How Western Civilization, began to take control of the world commerce and became the military power, dominated the seas, trade and became economic powers.

Thursday- How knowledge of the past, renewed the discovery of the future. How inventions lead to discovery of new lands and a new world and a change of the old world.

Friday- How the change in all of the factors, lead to the changes in politics and rapid development of the world.

 

 

2nd Hour American History

American Imperalism: Era 7: Standards: American Foreign policy and rise of American as a world power.

Monday- Review American History from 1890-1900’s. How America begin world Imperialism with the taking of Cuba from Spain and also the Philippines. Will review how the US  joined the rest of the world and begin world wide imperialistic attitudes.

Tuesday- Test

Wed.- The contradiction of American Progressives, and its leader Teddy Roosevelt over the treatment of the Filipino people. 

Thursday- The Rise of the Anti- Imperialism league and the debate over the Constitution protections, and its place in the Imperialistic age.

Friday- How China became a world wide conflict with many European nations in China,  and John Hay pushing the American policy of Open Door to the trade with China.

 

 

1st and 6th Hour:

World History- Mr. Willsey’s Lesson plans for 8-21-2017

 

Monday-Friday: Students will be introduced to the follow curriculum for the Worldd History

 

Each day we will read and discuss the Eras of Study for this year.

 

 

 

Course Title:            World History Since 1450    

 

World History                                                                                                                              

                                                                                                                              

Course Focus and Content

In Grade 6, students study world history from the beginnings of human civilization through 1500 CE, correlating civics/government, economics, and geography to the historic eras. World History 9-12 provides an in-depth study of the history of human society from Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770 to Era 9: Contemporary World since 1945. World History is designed to assist students in understanding the human condition, how people and countries of the world have become increasingly interconnected across time and space, and the ways different people view the same event or issue from a variety of perspectives. This course develops an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international/global relations. It requires an understanding of world cultures and civilizations, including an analysis of important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History references the eras and time periods from The National Center for History in the Schools.

 

Skills and Application

Throughout the course, students will develop and apply disciplinary literacy skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. As students seek answers to compelling and supporting questions, they will examine a variety of primary and secondary sources and communicate responses in multiple ways, including oral, visual, and written forms. Students must be able to select and evaluate sources of information, draw and build upon ideas, explore issues, examine data, and analyze events from the full range of human experience to develop critical thinking skills essential for productive citizens. World History is required by the Standards for Accreditation and does not need Arkansas Department of Education approval.

 

The acquisition of content knowledge and skills is paramount in a robust social studies program rooted in inquiry. The chart below summarizes social studies practices in Dimensions 1, 3, and 4 of The College, Career, & Civic Life C3 Framework for Social Studies State Standards. These practices should be addressed throughout Grades K-12, building as students acquire the skills. Dimension 2 sets forth the conceptual content, and the alignment to this dimension is embedded in the student learning expectations (SLEs).

Dimension 1 – Questions

Dimension 3 – Sources and Evidence

Dimension 4 – Communicating Ideas

1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

4. Gather relevant information from multiple perspectives and a variety of sources; evaluate the credibility of the source by determining its relevance and intended use

6. Construct arguments and explanations that convey ideas and perspectives to appropriate audiences using print, oral, and digital technologies

2. Develop supporting questions that contribute to inquiry: identifying facts, concepts, and interpretations

 

5. Use evidence from multiple sources to answer compelling and supporting questions by developing arguments with claims and counterclaims and providing explanations

7. Critique the credibility, relevance, and use of evidence in arguments and explanations proposed by self and others

3. Answer compelling and supporting questions using appropriate and available sources that consider multiple points of view

 

8. Use disciplinary lenses within the social sciences to understand local, regional, and global problems, proposing solutions or assessing strategies and options for action while applying deliberative processes

Engage in disciplinary thinking across the social sciences in Grades K-12

 

Strand                                        Content Standard

Era 6: Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770

 

 

  1. Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the first global age.  

Era 7: Age of Revolutions

1750-1900

 

 

  1. Students will analyze the global revolutionary changes that shaped the emerging modern world.

Era 8: Crisis and Achievement

1900-1945

 

 

  1. Students will analyze the reasons for and consequences of early 20th century crises and achievements.

Era 9: Contemporary World Since 1945

 

 

  1. Students will analyze the challenges and accomplishments of the contemporary world.

 

 

2nd Hour:  US History- Mr. Willsey’s Lesson plans for 8-21-2017

 

Monday-Friday: Students will be introduced to the follow curriculum for the US History

 

Each day we will read and discuss the Eras of Study for this year.

 

 

Course Title:            United States History Since 1890  

United States History Since 1890

 

Course Focus and Content

In Grades 5-8, students receive a strong foundation in United States History from pre-colonialism through the Progressive Era, allowing United States History Since 1890 to focus in greater depth on the effects of changing culture, technology, world economy, and environment, as well as the impact of global conflicts on contemporary society in the United States. The desired outcome of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the cause-and-effect relationship between past and present events, recognize patterns of interactions, and understand the impact of events in the United States within an interconnected world. United States History Since 1890 examines the emergence of the United States as a world power to the present. Students will examine the political, economic, geographic, social, and cultural development of the United States of America from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. United States History Since 1890 references the eras and time periods from The National Center for History in the Schools.

 

Skills and Application

Throughout the course, students will develop and apply disciplinary literacy skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. As students seek answers to compelling and supporting questions, they will examine a variety of primary and secondary sources and communicate responses in multiple ways, including oral, visual, and written forms. Students must be able to select and evaluate sources of information, draw and build upon ideas, explore issues, examine data, and analyze events from the full range of human experience to develop critical thinking skills essential for productive citizens. United States History Since 1890 is required by the Standards for Accreditation and does not need Arkansas Department of Education approval.

 

The acquisition of content knowledge and skills is paramount in a robust social studies program rooted in inquiry. The chart below summarizes social studies practices in Dimensions 1, 3, and 4 of The College, Career, & Civic Life C3 Framework for Social Studies State Standards. These practices should be addressed throughout Grades K-12, building as students acquire the skills. Dimension 2 sets forth the conceptual content, and the alignment to this dimension is embedded in the student learning expectations (SLEs).

Dimension 1 – Questions

Dimension 3 – Sources and Evidence

Dimension 4 – Communicating Ideas

1. Construct compelling questions that promote inquiry around key ideas and issues

4. Gather relevant information from multiple perspectives and a variety of sources; evaluate the credibility of the source by determining its relevance and intended use

6. Construct arguments and explanations that convey ideas and perspectives to appropriate audiences using print, oral, and digital technologies

2. Develop supporting questions that contribute to inquiry: identifying facts, concepts, and interpretations

 

5. Use evidence from multiple sources to answer compelling and supporting questions by developing arguments with claims and counterclaims and providing explanations

7. Critique the credibility, relevance, and use of evidence in arguments and explanations proposed by self and others

3. Answer compelling and supporting questions using appropriate and available sources that consider multiple points of view

 

8. Use disciplinary lenses within the social sciences to understand local, regional, and global problems, proposing solutions or assessing strategies and options for action while applying deliberative processes

Engage in disciplinary thinking across the social sciences in Grades K-12

 

 

 

Strand                                        Content Standard

Era 7: Emergence of Modern America 1890-1930

 

 

1.Students will evaluate the territorial expansion and foreign policy of the United States between 1890 and 1930.

2.Students will evaluate social, economic, and political changes in the United States between 1890 and 1930.

Era 8: The Great Depression and World War II 1929-1945

 

 

3.Students will evaluate social, economic, and political changes in the United States during and following the Great Depression.

4.Students will evaluate social, economic, and political changes in the United States during World War II.

Era 9: Post-war United States 1945 to Early 1970s

 

 

5.Students will analyze international events and trends resulting in the emergence of the United States as a superpower.

6.Students will analyze social, economic, and political changes in the United States between 1945 and 1970.

Era 10: Contemporary United States 1968 to Present

 

 

  1. Students will analyze domestic and foreign policies of the United States since 1968.
  1. Students will analyze social and economic trends of the United States since 1968.

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: May 8th-12th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the how we influence government

Standards: CPI.4.C.6 Citizen participation

 

Chapter 11: Influencing Government

Monday:  

 Public opinion includes the ideas and attitudes that most people hold about elected officials, candidates, government, and political issues. Public opinion can help elected officials make decisions. On any given issue, different groups of the public often hold different viewpoints. Their backgrounds and life experiences, as well as age, gender, income, race, religion, occupation, and place of residence, affect people's opinions. Public opinion is measured by looking at election results and public opinion polls.

Tuesday:

People who share a point of view about an issue may form what is called an interest group. These groups work at influencing public opinion. Some interest groups are based on economic interests, while others promote an ethnic group, age group, or gender. Interest groups use lobbyists to help them influence government officials. In order to influence the public, interest groups may use direct-mail campaigns or advertisements on television and radio. Some of the propaganda techniques they use are endorsements, stacked cards, bandwagon, glittering generalities, symbols, just plain folks, and name-calling.

 

Wednesday

The public is often affected by the mass media. Television, radio, newspapers, magazines, recordings, movies, and books are called the mass media because they communicate broadly to masses of people. Because of the modern media, some people are able to successfully run for office who might never have done so before. Elected officials want the media to portray them as effective leaders. They rely on their press secretaries to hold news conferences, give interviews, and stage media events. The mass media also play an important "watchdog" role over government activities.

 Thursday: Review

Friday Test

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2nd Hour AP American History

Organizing and handing in Class Work. 

 

3rd Hour American History

 

CUS 19 AH. 2  American policies since Nixon

 

Objectives:  The '80s:  Students will be able to identify and discuss the issues of the 1980’s

Main Theme: 

Relive the political, environmental, and pop cultural moments that made the 1980s an important time in U.S. history.

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.3       Analyze written documents that both articulate and contest the powers, responsi¬bilities, and limits of a variety of governments over time

Era7.2.WH.4       Analyze the reasons for and consequences of involuntary and voluntary mass migration

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

http://www.glencoe.com/sec/socialstudies/worldhistory/gwh2005/images/chapt_over.gif 
Chapter 28: The Contemporary Western World, 1970–Present

Main Theme:

The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the end of the Cold War, the collapse of Communist rule in Eastern Europe, and economic unification of Western Europe. American popular culture had a global influence, as did the use of terrorism as a political tool.

Monday: Section 1 Decline of the Soviet Union
The 1970s saw a relaxation of Cold War tensions, known as détente. The 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan brought back old fears of Soviet expansion. Tensions heightened further when Ronald Reagan called the Soviet Union an "evil empire" and began a new arms race. Leonid Brezhnev, the Soviet leader of the 1970s, had been uninterested in reform. However, Mikhail Gorbachev, who came to power in 1985, saw the need for radical change to save an ailing economy. Gorbachev coupled his domestic reform plans with an easing of Communist party control over the republics of the Soviet Union. Agreements with the United States sharply reduced nuclear arms stockpiles. Gorbachev's reforms led to the break-up of the Soviet Union into independent republics. Post-Soviet Russian leaders had to contend with the attempt by Chechen rebels to break away from the Russian Republic. Meanwhile, the shift to a free-market economy produced economic hardship, social disarray, and a sharp rise in organized crime.

Tuesday:  Section 2 Eastern Europe
The collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe took varying forms in the late 1980s. In Poland the Solidarity trade union led a decade-long struggle for change. Often, the collapse of the Communist order was more sudden. In Czechoslovakia mass demonstrations ousted the Communists swiftly and with little violence. Ethnic pressures later led to the division of the country into Slovakia and the Czech Republic. The killing of thousands of peaceful demonstrators in Romania caused the army to withdraw its support for the repressive dictatorship. It quickly collapsed. Street protests also brought the fall of Communism—and the Berlin Wall—in East Germany. Free elections led to German reunification. Yugoslavia split into multiple republics. Calls for the formation of a Greater Serbia in the former Yugoslavia produced two wars in which NATO blocked Serbian attempts to annex Bosnia and strip Kosovo of its status as an autonomous province.

Wed.   Section 3 Europe and North America
Economic problems plagued the West during the 1970s. A sharp increase in oil prices had ripple effects in most countries. After 1970 Western European nations moved toward economic union. A socialist, François Mitterand, tried unsuccessfully to remedy France's problems by expanding government ownership of business. Margaret Thatcher's budget cuts in Great Britain proved more successful but caused widespread poverty in old industrial areas. Although an economic boom in the 1980s at first helped West Germany absorb East Germany, German reunification proved to be more costly than originally thought. Subsequent economic problems led to a wave of anti-immigrant and neo-Nazi activity. In the United States, Jimmy Carter lost his reelection bid under the cloud of a hostage crisis and high inflation. Ronald Reagan made cutbacks in social programs but ordered a costly military buildup. Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton both left office under a cloud of misconduct. While Clinton oversaw an economic recovery, his legal problems helped elect a Republican, George W. Bush. In Canada, the province of Quebec came close to seceding during the 1990s.

Thursday:    Section 4 Western Society and Culture
Since 1970 the number of women in the work force has continued to rise, although women have continued to earn less than men. Issues of particular concern to women have gained prominence in political debates. Acts of terror have become a regular feature of Western society.

Friday: Test

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Lesson Plans: April 17th-21

Week of Testing: Will monitor and adjust classroom work in conjunction with the testing.

 

Lesson Plans: May 1st- May 5th   

Due to Testing last week- Will review and catch up students who were out.

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 16: Civil and Criminal Law

Chapter Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the Criminal court procedures.

Standards: CPI.4.C.6 Court procedures

Monday: Introduction to the two types of Cases Criminal and Civil Cases

Tuesday.      In-depth : Civil Cases

In civil cases the plaintiff claims to have suffered a loss and usually seeks damages from the defendant. The defendant argues either that the loss did not occur or that the defendant is not responsible for it. Lawsuits may involve property disputes, breach of contract, or family matters, such as divorce. If the suit is not settled, the case goes to trial.

Wed. In-depth : Criminal Cases

Criminal cases can be divided into crimes against people, crimes against property, and victimless crimes. Officers make arrests if they have witnessed a suspected crime, if a citizen has made a complaint or reported a crime, or if a judge has issued an arrest warrant. A preliminary hearing is followed by an indictment by a grand jury and arraignment. In many cases the prosecution and the defendant may reach a plea bargain. This is an agreement in which the accused person agrees to plead guilty, but to a lesser charge. If the case goes to trial, guilt or innocence will be determined by a jury or a judge.

Thursday: Juvenile Courts and the law.  Also test review.

Young people and the Court System: How the laws are different and affect those under 18.

In most states anyone under 18 is considered a juvenile, or someone not yet legally an adult. All states and the federal government allow juveniles who are charged with very serious crimes to be tried as adults. The juvenile justice system is able to treat young people in ways that are different from the adult system. The primary purpose of juvenile courts is to try to rehabilitate the person.

Friday: Test

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2nd Hour AP American History

Reviewing for next Weeks AP Test

 

3rd Hour American History

 

Continuation of the 1960’s

The inventions that changed our lives

Monday:          Assess what they already know about the '60s inventions

Tuesday:          How these inventions influence our lives today.

Wed.                Handout on various inventions

Thursday:        Service project with the Pre School

Friday:             Quiz using notes, to check the quality of note taking.

This project will integrate disciplines such as history, writing, art and technology, with presentations, research, and thinking and listening skills.

 

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.2       Analyze the social, economic, and political ideas that influenced the 18th and 19th century revolutions

Era7.2.WH.3       Analyze written documents that both articulate and contest the powers, responsi¬bilities, and limits of a variety of governments over time

Era7.2.WH.4       Analyze the reasons for and consequences of involuntary and voluntary mass migration

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

Chapter Overviews

Chapter 27: Cold War and Postwar Changes, 1945–1970

The Cold War came to define international relations and, at times, even domestic politics. Social change produced upheavals in Western societies. Soviet repression relaxed somewhat after Stalin while still containing the pressures for change.

Monday:    Section 1 Development of the Cold War
The rivalry between the Soviet Union and the United States was the focus of the Cold War. The American Marshall Plan tried to make communism less attractive by providing billions of dollars to help rebuild Western Europe. Germany became divided into two states, with a divided city of Berlin inside East Germany. In 1949 Communists took control in China, and the Soviet detonation of an atomic bomb launched a U.S.-Soviet arms race. Soviet and Western alliance systems spanned the globe. The Cuban missile crisis presented the frightening prospect of nuclear war. American policymakers perceived non-Communist South Vietnam as a domino that must not be permitted to fall to communism. Despite the eventual communist victory, the domino theory proved to be unfounded.

Tuesday:    Section 2 The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe
After World War II, Stalinist economic policies brought dramatic economic growth, but at a high cost. Most of the growth was in heavy industry. Consumer goods remained hard to find. Stalin's successor, Nikita Krushchev, condemned Stalinist terror, increased the production of consumer goods, and loosened controls on writers, such as Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Krushchev's rash decisions, such as the plan to place missiles in Cuba, convinced colleagues to remove him from office in 1964. After World War II, Soviet forces had occupied all of Eastern Europe and part of the Balkans. The occupied states now became Soviet satellites. Yugoslavia was the exception and developed into an independent Communist state. In Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia, attempts for reform threatened Soviet domination. In each case, the Soviet Union crushed these reforms by using threats or military force.

Wednesday:     Section 3 Western Europe and North America
The 1950s and 1960s were periods of dramatic economic growth in Western Europe. France and Germany both experienced rapid economic recoveries. In Great Britain, dire economic conditions forced Winston Churchill from power. The new Labor government set out to create a modern welfare state and began to dismantle the British empire. The formation of the European Economic Community created a powerful new trading bloc. Canada emerged as an industrial economy. In the United States, the New Deal had brought a long-term increase in the power of the federal government. Prosperity and Cold War suspicions defined the United States in the 1950s. Civil rights and the expansion of the New Deal were defining issues of the 1960s. Students protested U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. Simultaneously, a variety of issues sparked student revolts in Europe. Women began to fight against inequalities between the sexes.

Thursday: Re Test of previous testing. Hand in materials that were handed out to prepare for test.

Friday: Review and turn in work.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

Lesson Plans: April 24th – 28th  

 

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 16: Civil and Criminal Law

Chapter Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the Criminal court procedures.

Standards: CPI.4.C.6 Court procedures

Monday: Introduction to the two types of Cases Criminal and Civil Cases

Tuesday.      In-depth : Civil Cases

In civil cases the plaintiff claims to have suffered a loss and usually seeks damages from the defendant. The defendant argues either that the loss did not occur or that the defendant is not responsible for it. Lawsuits may involve property disputes, breach of contract, or family matters, such as divorce. If the suit is not settled, the case goes to trial.

Wed. In-depth : Criminal Cases

Criminal cases can be divided into crimes against people, crimes against property, and victimless crimes. Officers make arrests if they have witnessed a suspected crime, if a citizen has made a complaint or reported a crime, or if a judge has issued an arrest warrant. A preliminary hearing is followed by an indictment by a grand jury and arraignment. In many cases the prosecution and the defendant may reach a plea bargain. This is an agreement in which the accused person agrees to plead guilty, but to a lesser charge. If the case goes to trial, guilt or innocence will be determined by a jury or a judge.

Thursday: Juvenile Courts and the law.  Also test review.

Young people and the Court System: How the laws are different and affect those under 18.

In most states anyone under 18 is considered a juvenile, or someone not yet legally an adult. All states and the federal government allow juveniles who are charged with very serious crimes to be tried as adults. The juvenile justice system is able to treat young people in ways that are different from the adult system. The primary purpose of juvenile courts is to try to rehabilitate the person.

Friday: Test

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2nd Hour AP American History

Reviewing for next Weeks AP Test

 

3rd Hour American History

 

Continuation of the 1960’s

The inventions that changed our lives

Monday:          Assess what they already know about the '60s inventions

Tuesday:          How these inventions influence our lives today.

Wed.                Handout on various inventions

Thursday:        Service project with the Pre School

Friday:             Quiz using notes, to check the quality of note taking.

This project will integrate disciplines such as history, writing, art and technology, with presentations, research, and thinking and listening skills.

 

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.2       Analyze the social, economic, and political ideas that influenced the 18th and 19th century revolutions

Era7.2.WH.3       Analyze written documents that both articulate and contest the powers, responsi¬bilities, and limits of a variety of governments over time

Era7.2.WH.4       Analyze the reasons for and consequences of involuntary and voluntary mass migration

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

Chapter Overviews

Chapter 27: Cold War and Postwar Changes, 1945–1970

The Cold War came to define international relations and, at times, even domestic politics. Social change produced upheavals in Western societies. Soviet repression relaxed somewhat after Stalin while still containing the pressures for change.

Monday:    Section 1 Development of the Cold War
The rivalry between the Soviet Union and the United States was the focus of the Cold War. The American Marshall Plan tried to make communism less attractive by providing billions of dollars to help rebuild Western Europe. Germany became divided into two states, with a divided city of Berlin inside East Germany. In 1949 Communists took control in China, and the Soviet detonation of an atomic bomb launched a U.S.-Soviet arms race. Soviet and Western alliance systems spanned the globe. The Cuban missile crisis presented the frightening prospect of nuclear war. American policymakers perceived non-Communist South Vietnam as a domino that must not be permitted to fall to communism. Despite the eventual communist victory, the domino theory proved to be unfounded.

Tuesday:    Section 2 The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe
After World War II, Stalinist economic policies brought dramatic economic growth, but at a high cost. Most of the growth was in heavy industry. Consumer goods remained hard to find. Stalin's successor, Nikita Krushchev, condemned Stalinist terror, increased the production of consumer goods, and loosened controls on writers, such as Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Krushchev's rash decisions, such as the plan to place missiles in Cuba, convinced colleagues to remove him from office in 1964. After World War II, Soviet forces had occupied all of Eastern Europe and part of the Balkans. The occupied states now became Soviet satellites. Yugoslavia was the exception and developed into an independent Communist state. In Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia, attempts for reform threatened Soviet domination. In each case, the Soviet Union crushed these reforms by using threats or military force.

Wednesday:     Section 3 Western Europe and North America
The 1950s and 1960s were periods of dramatic economic growth in Western Europe. France and Germany both experienced rapid economic recoveries. In Great Britain, dire economic conditions forced Winston Churchill from power. The new Labor government set out to create a modern welfare state and began to dismantle the British empire. The formation of the European Economic Community created a powerful new trading bloc. Canada emerged as an industrial economy. In the United States, the New Deal had brought a long-term increase in the power of the federal government. Prosperity and Cold War suspicions defined the United States in the 1950s. Civil rights and the expansion of the New Deal were defining issues of the 1960s. Students protested U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. Simultaneously, a variety of issues sparked student revolts in Europe. Women began to fight against inequalities between the sexes.

Thursday: Re Test of previous testing. Hand in materials that were handed out to prepare for test.

Friday: Review and turn in work.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Lesson Plans: April 17th-21

Week of Testing: Will monitor and adjust classroom work in conjunction with the testing.

 

Lesson Plans: April 10th- 14th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 8: Section 3 The Supreme Court

Chapter Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the Supreme court procedures.

Standards: CPI.4.C.6 Court procedures

Monday: Review the  role and make up  of Supreme Court

Tuesday.     Continue Mondays Review

Wed. –Thursday: Follow the confirmation of the new Supreme Court Justices.

Review some the major Cases Starting with Marbury Vs Madison

Friday: Test

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2nd Hour AP American History

Chapter 20: The Imperial Republic

Objectives

A thorough study of Chapter Twenty should enable the student to understand:

1. The new Manifest Destiny, and how it differed from the old Manifest Destiny.

2. The objectives of American foreign policy at the turn of the century with respect to Europe, Latin America, and Asia.

3. The variety of factors that motivated the United States to become imperialistic.

4. The relationship between American economic interests (especially tariff policy) and developments in Hawaii, Cuba, and Puerto Rico.

5. The causes of the Spanish-American War.

6. The military and political problems encountered in fighting the Spanish and, subsequently, the Filipinos.

7. The problems involved in developing a colonial administration for America’s new empire.

8. The motives behind the Open Door notes and the Boxer intervention.

9. The nature of the military reforms carried out following the Spanish-American War.

Monday:

In depth study of TR Roosevelt and the connection to Abraham Lincoln

Tuesday 

1. Why Americans turned from the old continental concept of Manifest Destiny to a new worldwide expansionism.

Wed.

2. How the Spanish-American War served as the catalyst to transform imperialist stirrings into a full-fledged empire.

Thursday:

3. How the nation had to make attitudinal, political, and military adjustments to its new role as a major world power.

Friday: Test

 

3rd Hour American History:

Continue the 1960’s USH- 19 Am. Hist and AH – 6

The rise of the Counter culture.

Monday:          Assess what they already know about the '60s.

Tuesday:          Learn facts and details, and identify causes and issues that shaped the era.

Wed.                Consider the impact of the decade on individuals who experienced it.

Thursday:        Think about how the '60s shaped the future of the U.S. and the world.

Friday:             Use a variety of resources and learning strategies to focus on students' knowledge, and what they want to learn more about.

This project will integrate disciplines such as history, writing, art and technology, with presentations, research, and thinking and listening skills.

 

Rise of Nationalism in the Asia, Africa and Latin America

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.6       Analyze the social, economic, and political ideas that influenced the 19th and 20th century revolutions

Era7.2.WH.5       Analyze the rise of Nationalism in third world Countries.

Era7.2.WH.7       Analyze the reasons for the west to capitalize on the nationalism of the west.

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

 

 

Chapter Overviews

Chapter 25: Nationalism Around the World, 1919–1939

Nationalism was a major force in the Middle East, Africa, and India after World War I. In China, the Nationalists forced the Communists into retreat and formed a republic. An expansionist military took power in Japan. Economic crisis led to military dictatorships throughout Latin America.

Monday:  Section 1 Nationalism in the Middle East
World War I was the final blow for an Ottoman Empire in its decline since the late eighteenth century. One of its final acts was an act of genocide, the slaughter of Armenians seeking independence. Nationalist leaders in the collapsing empire established the independent states of Turkey, Iran, and Saudi Arabia. Britain and France withdrew their promised support for Arab nationalists and set up British mandates in Iraq and Jordan, and French mandates in Lebanon and Syria. Saudi Arabia had vast supplies of newly discovered oil and suddenly attracted Western oil companies that would bring the kingdom untold wealth. Palestine became a site of conflict beginning with the British Balfour Declaration of 1917, which declared Palestine the site for a Jewish homeland. Tensions between Jews and Muslims only worsened as Jewish immigrants fleeing Nazi persecution flooded Palestine.

Tuesday  Section 2 Nationalism in Africa and Asia
After World War I, Germany lost its African colonies to Britain and France. Violent suppression and the slow pace of reform in the colonies led many Africans to agitate for independence. Two African Americans, W.E.B. Du Bois and Marcus Garvey, were influential in building African cultural awareness and Pan-African unity. Mohandas Gandhi built a large movement for Indian independence through nonviolence. Indian Muslims felt sidelined by the largest independence organization, the Indian National Congress, and called for a separate Muslim state. Rapid industrialization in Japan led to support for territorial expansion to improve Japan's access to raw materials and markets. After a period of pacifism prompted in part by pressure from the United States, Japan conquered Manchuria, and the military took control of the government. The Communist International helped build Communist parties in China and Southeast Asia.

Wed.    Section 3 Revolutionary Chaos in China
As central authority collapsed in China, rival Nationalist and Communist Party forces briefly joined ranks. The two groups split after a Nationalist massacre of Communists. The Nationalists, led by Chiang Kai-shek, founded a new Chinese republic in 1928. The Communists, led by Mao Zedong, went into hiding in the cities. Mao's plans, however, were for a revolution led by peasants. In 1933 Mao's forces used guerrilla tactics to break through Nationalist lines closing in on them. They then began the Long March to the last surviving Communist base. Chiang had plans for land reform and a Western-style constitutional government. To make Western ideas palatable, he blended them with Confucian themes. Although he did achieve some meaningful reforms, Chiang's support came mainly from the rural gentry and the urban middle class; his reforms did little to redistribute wealth.

Thursday:   Section 4 Nationalism in Latin America
American investors directly controlled many Latin American industries beginning in the 1920s. Latin American nationalists claimed that U.S. investments propped up the regions' dictators. The Great Depression weakened regional economies and led to the creation of government-run industries, since Latin Americans could not afford many imported goods. Economic crisis and instability prompted military leaders to overthrow the elected governments—which were dominated by small elites—and to establish authoritarian regimes. Dictators sometimes gained an urban following by promising better factory conditions. Industrialization became a core government project. Fascist symbols and nationalist slogans were used amid harsh political repression. In Mexico, a single-party state dominated society. The popular Depression-era leader Lázaro Cárdenas nationalized foreign-owned oil companies and redistributed land to Mexican peasants. Artists helped build national identity in many Latin American countries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday: Test

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Lesson Plans: March. 27th -31st

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 16: Civil and Criminal Law

Chapter Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the Criminal court procedures.

Standards: CPI.4.C.6 Court procedures

Monday: Introduction to the two types of Cases Criminal and Civil Cases

Tuesday.      In-depth : Civil Cases

In civil cases the plaintiff claims to have suffered a loss and usually seeks damages from the defendant. The defendant argues either that the loss did not occur or that the defendant is not responsible for it. Lawsuits may involve property disputes, breach of contract, or family matters, such as divorce. If the suit is not settled, the case goes to trial.

Wed. In-depth : Criminal Cases

Criminal cases can be divided into crimes against people, crimes against property, and victimless crimes. Officers make arrests if they have witnessed a suspected crime, if a citizen has made a complaint or reported a crime, or if a judge has issued an arrest warrant. A preliminary hearing is followed by an indictment by a grand jury and arraignment. In many cases the prosecution and the defendant may reach a plea bargain. This is an agreement in which the accused person agrees to plead guilty, but to a lesser charge. If the case goes to trial, guilt or innocence will be determined by a jury or a judge.

Thursday: Juvenile Courts and the law.  Also test review.

Young people and the Court System: How the laws are different and affect those under 18.

In most states anyone under 18 is considered a juvenile, or someone not yet legally an adult. All states and the federal government allow juveniles who are charged with very serious crimes to be tried as adults. The juvenile justice system is able to treat young people in ways that are different from the adult system. The primary purpose of juvenile courts is to try to rehabilitate the person.

Friday: Test

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2nd Hour AP American History

Chapter 17: INDUSTRIAL SUPREMACY

 

 

Main themes of Chapter Seventeen:

How various factors (raw materials, labor supply, new technology, business organization, growing markets, and friendly governments) combined to thrust the United States into worldwide industrial leadership

 

How this explosion of industrial capitalism was both extolled for its accomplishments and attacked for its excesses

 

 

How American workers, who on the average benefited, reacted to the physical and psychological realities of the new economic order

 

A thorough study of Chapter Seventeen should enable the student to understand the following:

The reasons for the rapid industrial development of the United States in the late nineteenth century

 

The impact of individual entrepreneurship and technological innovations in promoting industrial expansion, and the development of new industries such as steel, oil, automobiles, and aviation

 

The changes that were taking place in the incorporation, organization, and management of American business

 

The ways in which older notions of individualism and the newer concept of Social Darwinism combined to preach the gospel of wealth and to justify the social consequences of the new industrial capitalism

 

The critics of the new industrial capitalism, and the solutions they proposed

 

The conditions of immigrants, women, and children in the work force

 

The attempt by organized labor to form national associations, and the reasons why craft-based labor organizations became the norm

 

Monday: Introduction

Tuseday: Study Questions

Wed.  – Essay Qeustions

Thrusday- Handouts of the industrial age.

Friday- Discussion and catch up.

 

The reasons that organized labor generally failed in its efforts to achieve its objectives

Monday:          Assess what they already know about the '60s.

Tuesday:          Learn facts and details, and identify causes and issues that shaped the era.

Wed.                Consider the impact of the decade on individuals who experienced it.

Thursday:        Think about how the '60s shaped the future of the U.S. and the world.

Friday:             Use a variety of resources and learning strategies to focus on students' knowledge, and what they want to learn more about.

This project will integrate disciplines such as history, writing, art and technology, with presentations, research, and thinking and listening skills.

 

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.2       Analyze the social, economic, and political ideas that influenced the 18th and 19th century revolutions

Era7.2.WH.3       Analyze written documents that both articulate and contest the powers, responsi¬bilities, and limits of a variety of governments over time

Era7.2.WH.4       Analyze the reasons for and consequences of involuntary and voluntary mass migration

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

Chapter Overviews

Chapter 24: The West Between the Wars, 1919–1939

http://highered.mheducation.com/olcweb/styles/shared/spacer.gifBy clicking on the links below, students can read a summary of the chapter, learn more about a chapter-related topic by completing a web-based activity, take a ten-question quiz to test their knowledge of the chapter, have fun and challenge themselves with a puzzle or game based on the chapter content, and quiz themselves or fellow students using eFlashcards for chapter-specific academic vocabulary, glossary terms, and people, places, and events.

Monday:        Section 1 The Futile Search for Stability
The peace settlement at the end of World War I left many nations unhappy and border disputes simmering throughout Europe. The League of Nations proved a weak institution. Democracy was widespread, and women in many European countries gained the right to vote. However, economic problems plagued France,

Tuesday  The Rise of Dictatorial Regimes
By 1939 most European democracies had collapsed. Only France and Great Britain remained democratic. Benito Mussolini began his political career as a Socialist, but he abandoned socialism for fascism, which glorified the state and justified the suppression of all political dissent. In Italy, Mussolini outlawed most political opposition, but also compromised with powerful groups and never achieved totalitarian control.

Wed.       Section 3 Hitler and Nazi Germany
Adolf Hitler, a failed student and artist, built up a small racist, anti-Semitic political party in Germany after World War I. Hitler's Beer Hall Putsch failed. In prison, he wrote Mein Kampf—an account of his movement and his views. As democracy broke down, right-wing elites looked to Hitler for leadership. destructive rampage against Jews and the deportation of thousands to concentration camps. Increasingly drastic steps barred Jews from attending school, earning a living, or engaging in Nazi society.

Thursday:  Section 4 Cultural and Intellectual Trends
After World War I, radio and film became sources of entertainment as well as propaganda tools.

Friday: Test

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

Lesson Plans: March. 13th-17th    

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 3: The Constitution

USC.6.CCC.2 Describe the procedures required to amend the United States Constitution and how to interpret the constituiong.

Chapter Objectives: Students will learn

How the Constitution has been interpreted  Strict(orginalism)  vs A Living Constitution(loose)

Monday: Video and handouts on the two type of interpretations.

Tuesday: Jefferson Vs Hamilton- Ideas became known, as Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian

Wed.- Learn of the Elastic Clause- as interpreted from Article 1, Section 8 and Clause 18-

Case study Thomas Jefferson buying the Louisiana Purchase.

Thursday: Modern example the Affordable Health Care

Friday: Are and were these cases correctly ruled. What is Ur prespective.

 

2nd Hour AP American History

Chapter 17 the Industrial Revolution in America

Students will finish the following Chapter objectives:

A thorough study of Chapter Seventeen should enable the student to understand:

1. The reasons for the rapid industrial development of the United States in the late nineteenth century.

2. The specific impact of technological innovation in promoting industrial expansion.

3. The role of the individual entrepreneur in the development of particular industries.

4. The changes that were taking place in American business organization.

5. The ways in which classical economics and certain ideas of Darwin were used to justify and defend the new industrial capitalism.

6. The critics of the new industrial capitalism, and the solutions they proposed.

7. The conditions of immigrants, women, and children in the work force.

8. The several efforts of organized labor to form national associations.

9. The reasons that organized labor generally failed in its efforts to achieve its objectives.

 

3rd Hour American History

The Role of the Media in American History

Students will learn how the media influences and reflects American Society.

Era9.6.USH.2      Analyze causes and effects of cultural changes on society in the United States

(e.g., changing roles of women, forces of change on the nuclear family, suburbanization) And how the media responded these Changes.

Monday- Discuss what the media is? Once newspapers and pamphlets

Tuesday- Handout on Americans view of the media and its trust.

Wed- The pros and cons of the media

Thursday- How the media helps us listen, debate, compromise and finally making decisions on the issues of the day.

Friday-Test on the media

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Students will how the unresolved issues of WW I lead to WWII.

Era8.3.WH.4 Analyze short- and long-term outcomes of World War I and leading up to World War I

Monday- List of reasons from the goal of military in Germany- to the new Weldmar Republic.

Tuesday- How the treaty of Paris help set the stage for failure of the German economy, and the Republic.

Handout on Germany financial cost due to the war and its final payment in 2010

Wed. – How the military Occupation alienated the German public.

Thursday- Friday: Handout on rise of Inflation and the role of Hitler taking advantage of the chaos. Etc.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: March. 6th-10th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 3: The Constitution

Standards: CPI.1.C.3

            Analyze the rationale for the structure of the U.S. Constitution using a variety of primary and secondary sources=

CPI.1.C.4       Analyze the purpose, organization, authority, and function of each of the three branches of government at the federal and state levels

Chapter Objectives: Students will learn

Articles of Conf. needed to be strengthened. Disagreements arose over representation in Congress, taxation, how to calculate population, trade, and other important matters. Through a series of compromises  a Constitution was formed.

Learn The Constitution has three main parts: a Preamble, seven articles, and twenty-seven amendments.

Three Branches and their powers, and the idea of Separation of Powers

Monday: Review for chapter 2 test

Tuesday: Test and start of Chapter 3

Section 1: The Nation's First Governments
 

Wed.: Learn about:
Section 2: The Road to the Constitution

Thursday.

Section 3: The Structure of Our Constitution

Friday

Section 4: Principles Underlying the Constitution

 

2nd Hour AP American History

Continue chapter 14 and Civil War.

Class will read, take notes and discuss the events that lead to Civil War.

Monday- Friday: Lincolns Inaugural Address, the failure of compromise, rising tensions and the start of war

At Fort Sumnter, the North and South Strategy and How the war proceeded  and the role of Emancipation proclamation and How modern Culture reflects the attitude towards the war still to this day.

3rd Hour American History

Winning Over Hearts and Minds: Analyzing WWII Propaganda Posters

Propaganda played a key part in the United States’ war effort. Although much more subtle, propaganda was as much a weapon of the war as manpower and ammunition. In addition to the radio broadcasts, movies, and comic books, over 200,000 poster designs were produced during WWII by the Office of War Information (OWI), The Treasury Department, branches of the armed force, and recruitment bureaus. These groups used many propaganda types (fear, bandwagon, etc.) and many themes (conservation, recruitment, etc.) to win over the hearts and minds of Americans.

Objective:

By examining propaganda posters from WWII students will increase their knowledge of propaganda tools and develop an understanding of the specific goals and strategies used by the U.S. government and OWI during WWII.

Standards:

History Thinking Standard 2—the student comprehends a variety of historical sources and appreciates historical perspectives as revealed through the arts.

Content Era 8 (1929-1945) Standard 3C—the student understands the effects of the war at home.

Monday-Friday We will examine each of the types of propaganda

Poster One—(Bandwagon): The poster encourages everyone join the war effort-to build arms for victory.

Poster Two—(Fear): The poster shows children in the shadow of the Nazis. If you do not buy war bonds-the Nazis will come for your children (fear).

Poster Three—Euphemism and Fear: The poster shows a sailor dead on the beach-but his death is called a “loss.” The poster also uses fear as a motivator for not speaking out of turn.

Poster Four—Glittering Generalities: The poster shows a women canning food and supporting rationing. It is “patriotic” to do these things (it is a glittering generality because patriotic means different things to different people).

Poster Five—Transfer: The poster shows men fighting in the American Revolution and WWII. If you believe that the Revolutionary War was necessary (for liberty) then of course you should fight in this war (for liberty). The poster transfers the importance of and reason for the American Revolution to WWII.

Poster Six—Testimonial: The poster shows Santa telling everyone to buy war bonds. There are few more recognizable images then Santa. Children and adults would have recognized the image.

 

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.2       Analyze the social, economic, and political ideas that influenced the 18th and 19th century revolutions

Era7.2.WH.3       Analyze written documents that both articulate and contest the powers, responsi¬bilities, and limits of a variety of governments over time

Era7.2.WH.4       Analyze the reasons for and consequences of involuntary and voluntary mass migration

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

Chapter Overviews

An assassination in the Balkans sparked the outbreak of World War I. Millions died during the war, which also led to a revolution and Communist rule in Russia. The war settlements redrew the map of Europe and imposed heavy penalties on Germany.

Monday: Students will learn that:

Section 2 The War
1. Most people in 1914 believed that the war would end quickly.

2. The picture changed, though, as trench warfare between France and Germany turned into a stalemate and casualties mounted throughout Europe.

Tuesday:

1.  Italy switched sides, and the Ottoman Empire joined the war on the side of the Triple Alliance.

2. The war broadened further when German colonies came under attack and the British encouraged Ottoman provinces in the Middle East to revolt.

Wednesday: 

  1. The United States entered the war in 1917 in response to the German use of submarines against passenger ships.
  2.  2. As the war dragged on, governments took control of national economies, censored the news media, and used propaganda to bolster public opinion.

Thursday:

  1. Women entered the workforce in large numbers.
  2. After the war, many lost their jobs to men but gained expanded rights and status. By 1921 women had the vote in Austria, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States.

 

Friday: Test

 

Lesson Plans:  Feb. 27 –March 3rd

Monday: All classes will review last weeks work.

Tuesday: ACT  Testing

1st Hour: Civics:

Content Standard 6: Students shall describe the organization, authority, and function of the United States government as defined by the United States Constitution.

USC.6.CCC

.1 Describe the reason for the organization of government in the United States Constitution USC.6.CCC.

2 Describe the procedures required to amend the United States Constitution USC.6.CCC.

3 Compare delegated, concurrent, and reserved powers

Students: Will be able to list the three branches,  checks and balances, Principle and types of power.

Handout for proper outline will be handed out Monday and each day we will work on breaking down each section, by the outline method.

Wed. – Reiview the Amendment process

Thursday: Continue studying of Amendment  

Friday: Test on Amendments

 

2nd Hour American History

Chapter 16: THE CONQUEST OF THE FAR WEST

http://glencoe.mheducation.com/olcweb/styles/shared/spacer.gifMain themes of Chapter Sixteen:

  • The varied and vibrant ethnic and racial cultures that characterized the American West and how Anglo-European whites enforced their dominant role by the latter part of the nineteenth century
  • The transformation of the Far West from a sparsely populated region of Indians, and various early settlers of European and Asian background into a part of the nation's capitalistic economy
  • The closing of the frontier as Indian resistance was eliminated, miners and cowboys spearheaded settlements, and government-subsidized railroads opened the area for intensive development
  • The development of mining, ranching, and commercial farming as the three major industries of the West
  • The problems faced by farmers as the agricultural sector entered a relative decline

A thorough study of Chapter Sixteen should enable the student to understand the following:

  • The cultural characteristics of the varied populations of the region

The pattern of settlement of the last American frontier, and the significance of the frontier in American history

  • The growth of the American cultural romance with the West, as reflected by the Rocky Mountain school, the writings of Mark Twain, and the shows of Buffalo Bill Cody
  • The impact of the discovery of gold and silver in the West both on the region and on the nation as a whole
  • The development of the cattle industry in the American Southwest after 1860
  • The methods used by the federal government to reduce the threat of the Plains Indians, and the Indians' ultimate fate
  • The reasons for the transition from subsistence farming to commercial farming, the effect of the change on the West, and the growing agrarian malaise affecting farmers in the wake of urban industrialization

Wed.- Test results and make up               

Thursday-  Test Review

Friday- Test

 

3RD Hour American History:

Era8 USH 4 Investigate social, economic, and political effects of World War II

Lesson 1: America After World War II Time

Objectives: Students will: 1. Recall, discuss and build on what they have studied about the United States during the period prior to World War II in order to compare and contrast key themes from the era (isolationism, the Great Depression, etc.) with that of the United States immediately following the war

 (superpower status, the United Nations, the economic boom, and changing economy).

2. Be introduced to many of the key terms and themes of the period 1945-1989.

3. Become familiar with the other members of their group and begin work on the culminating activity.

The presentation/lecture addresses the state of the country at the end of World War II and focuses on four key areas

  1. WEDNESDAY:    Allow time for class discussions on how 1945 compares to today. Culpeper is currently undergoing rapid population growth as it increasingly becomes a bedroom community for Northern Virginia.
  2. THURSDAY :    How many of their parents work in factories as opposed to a service related industry? What is the role of the United States in the world today
  3. Test Friday on the World After WWII.

 

World History 4th and 6th Hour

World War I Propaganda Posters

 

Summary

In this lesson, students will examine World War I posters from the United States in order to learn

about the objectives of wartime propagandists and the tools they use to meet those objectives.

 

Objectives

Students will:

1) Learn about propagandists’ tools during wartime;

2) Examine World War I propaganda posters from the United States, and;

3) Discuss and record the objective(s) the poster was designed to achieve, and the tools used

in it.

 

U.S. History Event

World War I

 

1.) Inform students that in this activity they will examine WWI propaganda posters from the United States to learn

about propagandists’ objectives and tools during wartime.

 Review with students the common objectives and tools of propagandists during wartime.

 

3.) Once students understand the common objectives and tools of propagandists during wartime, tell them that

they will now analyze the objective and tools of a propaganda poster as a class.

 

 

 What were some of the common objectives you identified in the propaganda posters?

 

 What were some of the most common tools you identified in the propaganda posters?

 

 To what extent does propaganda appeal to emotions and not reason? Why do you think this is

so?

 

 Can you think of any forms of propaganda that affect your life? How do these forms of

propaganda appeal to emotions of fear, hatred, sympathy, patriotism, or consumerism?

 

 

 Have you ever been personally affected by a piece of propaganda? Explain.

 

 How can you recognize propaganda in today’s world? Should the government try to limit or ban

propaganda? Why or why not

 

Wed. and Thursday: the  Handout committee on Public information.

Friday: Test on Propaganda

 

Lesson Plans:  2-(13-17)- 2072

1st Hour: Civics:

Content Standard 6: Students shall describe the organization, authority, and function of the United States government as defined by the United States Constitution.

USC.6.CCC

.1 Describe the reason for the organization of government in the United States Constitution USC.6.CCC.

2 Describe the procedures required to amend the United States Constitution USC.6.CCC.

3 Compare delegated, concurrent, and reserved powers

Students: Will be able to list the three branches,  checks and balances, Principle and types of power.

Handout for proper outline will be handed out Monday and each day we will work on breaking down each section, by the outline method.

Monday: page 86 and handout on section 3 of chapter 3.

Tuesday: and Wed.: Page 120 and the First Amendment.

Thursday: Page 126 The Bill of rights

Friday: Test on Constitution.

 

2nd Hour American History

Chapter 16: THE CONQUEST OF THE FAR WEST

http://glencoe.mheducation.com/olcweb/styles/shared/spacer.gifMain themes of Chapter Sixteen:

  • The varied and vibrant ethnic and racial cultures that characterized the American West and how Anglo-European whites enforced their dominant role by the latter part of the nineteenth century
  • The transformation of the Far West from a sparsely populated region of Indians, and various early settlers of European and Asian background into a part of the nation's capitalistic economy
  • The closing of the frontier as Indian resistance was eliminated, miners and cowboys spearheaded settlements, and government-subsidized railroads opened the area for intensive development
  • The development of mining, ranching, and commercial farming as the three major industries of the West
  • The problems faced by farmers as the agricultural sector entered a relative decline

A thorough study of Chapter Sixteen should enable the student to understand the following:

  • The cultural characteristics of the varied populations of the region

The pattern of settlement of the last American frontier, and the significance of the frontier in American history

  • The growth of the American cultural romance with the West, as reflected by the Rocky Mountain school, the writings of Mark Twain, and the shows of Buffalo Bill Cody
  • The impact of the discovery of gold and silver in the West both on the region and on the nation as a whole
  • The development of the cattle industry in the American Southwest after 1860
  • The methods used by the federal government to reduce the threat of the Plains Indians, and the Indians' ultimate fate
  • The reasons for the transition from subsistence farming to commercial farming, the effect of the change on the West, and the growing agrarian malaise affecting farmers in the wake of urban industrialization

Monday: Students will get a copy of the above goals of the chapter and also study questions for chapter  16.

Tuesday:  Continue working on the Study Questions.

 

3RD Hour American History:

Era8 USH 4 Investigate social, economic, and political effects of World War II

Lesson 1: America After World War II Time

Objectives: Students will: 1. Recall, discuss and build on what they have studied about the United States during the period prior to World War II in order to compare and contrast key themes from the era (isolationism, the Great Depression, etc.) with that of the United States immediately following the war

 (superpower status, the United Nations, the economic boom, and changing economy).

2. Be introduced to many of the key terms and themes of the period 1945-1989.

3. Become familiar with the other members of their group and begin work on the culminating activity.

The presentation/lecture addresses the state of the country at the end of World War II and focuses on four key areas

  1. MONDAY     (economy, population, migration, and foreign policy of US post War.
  2. TUESDAY:   The goal with each slide is to compare the immediate post war period with that of the preceding interwar period. (Great Depression to post war boom, smaller families to the Baby Boom, cities to suburbs, isolationism to the United Nations). •
  3.  WEDNESDAY:    Allow time for class discussions on how 1945 compares to today. Culpeper is currently undergoing rapid population growth as it increasingly becomes a bedroom community for Northern Virginia.
  4. THURSDAY :    How many of their parents work in factories as opposed to a service related industry? What is the role of the United States in the world today
  5. Test Friday on the World After WWII.

 

World History 4th and 6th Hour

World War I Propaganda Posters

 

Summary

In this lesson, students will examine World War I posters from the United States in order to learn

about the objectives of wartime propagandists and the tools they use to meet those objectives.

 

Objectives

Students will:

1) Learn about propagandists’ tools during wartime;

2) Examine World War I propaganda posters from the United States, and;

3) Discuss and record the objective(s) the poster was designed to achieve, and the tools used

in it.

 

U.S. History Event

World War I

 

1.) Inform students that in this activity they will examine WWI propaganda posters from the United States to learn

about propagandists’ objectives and tools during wartime.

 Review with students the common objectives and tools of propagandists during wartime.

 

3.) Once students understand the common objectives and tools of propagandists during wartime, tell them that

they will now analyze the objective and tools of a propaganda poster as a class.

 

Monday: Learn the different type of propaganda and there use in World War One.

 

 

Tuesday – Thursday- Students will address each day the following questions and with handouts be able to answer each one on the basis of their knowledge and  their understanding of the information.

 

 What were some of the common objectives you identified in the propaganda posters?

 

 What were some of the most common tools you identified in the propaganda posters?

 

 To what extent does propaganda appeal to emotions and not reason? Why do you think this is

so?

 

 Can you think of any forms of propaganda that affect your life? How do these forms of

propaganda appeal to emotions of fear, hatred, sympathy, patriotism, or consumerism?

 

 

 Have you ever been personally affected by a piece of propaganda? Explain.

 

 How can you recognize propaganda in today’s world? Should the government try to limit or ban

propaganda? Why or why not

 

Friday: Test on Propaganda

 

Lesson Plans: Feb. 6th-10th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 3: The Constitution

Standards: CPI.1.C.3

            Analyze the rationale for the structure of the U.S. Constitution using a variety of primary and secondary sources=

CPI.1.C.4       Analyze the purpose, organization, authority, and function of each of the three branches of government at the federal and state levels

Chapter Objectives: Students will learn

Articles of Conf. needed to be strengthened. Disagreements arose over representation in Congress, taxation, how to calculate population, trade, and other important matters. Through a series of compromises  a Constitution was formed.

Learn The Constitution has three main parts: a Preamble, seven articles, and twenty-seven amendments.

Three Branches and their powers, and the idea of Separation of Powers

Monday: Review for chapter 2 test

Tuesday: Test and start of Chapter 3

Section 1: The Nation's First Governments
 

Wed.: Learn about:
Section 2: The Road to the Constitution

Thursday.

Section 3: The Structure of Our Constitution

Friday

Section 4: Principles Underlying the Constitution

 

2nd Hour AP American History

Continue chapter 14 and Civil War.

Class will read, take notes and discuss the events that lead to Civil War.

Monday- Friday: Lincolns Inaugural Address, the failure of compromise, rising tensions and the start of war

At Fort Sumnter, the North and South Strategy and How the war proceeded  and the role of Emancipation proclamation and How modern Culture reflects the attitude towards the war still to this day.

3rd Hour American History

Winning Over Hearts and Minds: Analyzing WWII Propaganda Posters

Propaganda played a key part in the United States’ war effort. Although much more subtle, propaganda was as much a weapon of the war as manpower and ammunition. In addition to the radio broadcasts, movies, and comic books, over 200,000 poster designs were produced during WWII by the Office of War Information (OWI), The Treasury Department, branches of the armed force, and recruitment bureaus. These groups used many propaganda types (fear, bandwagon, etc.) and many themes (conservation, recruitment, etc.) to win over the hearts and minds of Americans.

Objective:

By examining propaganda posters from WWII students will increase their knowledge of propaganda tools and develop an understanding of the specific goals and strategies used by the U.S. government and OWI during WWII.

Standards:

History Thinking Standard 2—the student comprehends a variety of historical sources and appreciates historical perspectives as revealed through the arts.

Content Era 8 (1929-1945) Standard 3C—the student understands the effects of the war at home.

Monday-Friday We will examine each of the types of propaganda

Poster One—(Bandwagon): The poster encourages everyone join the war effort-to build arms for victory.

Poster Two—(Fear): The poster shows children in the shadow of the Nazis. If you do not buy war bonds-the Nazis will come for your children (fear).

Poster Three—Euphemism and Fear: The poster shows a sailor dead on the beach-but his death is called a “loss.” The poster also uses fear as a motivator for not speaking out of turn.

Poster Four—Glittering Generalities: The poster shows a women canning food and supporting rationing. It is “patriotic” to do these things (it is a glittering generality because patriotic means different things to different people).

Poster Five—Transfer: The poster shows men fighting in the American Revolution and WWII. If you believe that the Revolutionary War was necessary (for liberty) then of course you should fight in this war (for liberty). The poster transfers the importance of and reason for the American Revolution to WWII.

Poster Six—Testimonial: The poster shows Santa telling everyone to buy war bonds. There are few more recognizable images then Santa. Children and adults would have recognized the image.

 

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Era7.2.WH.2       Analyze the social, economic, and political ideas that influenced the 18th and 19th century revolutions

Era7.2.WH.3       Analyze written documents that both articulate and contest the powers, responsi¬bilities, and limits of a variety of governments over time

Era7.2.WH.4       Analyze the reasons for and consequences of involuntary and voluntary mass migration

(e.g., historical events, cultural practices, climate variability, resource use)

Chapter Overviews

An assassination in the Balkans sparked the outbreak of World War I. Millions died during the war, which also led to a revolution and Communist rule in Russia. The war settlements redrew the map of Europe and imposed heavy penalties on Germany.

Monday: Students will learn that:

Section 2 The War
1. Most people in 1914 believed that the war would end quickly.

2. The picture changed, though, as trench warfare between France and Germany turned into a stalemate and casualties mounted throughout Europe.

Tuesday:

1.  Italy switched sides, and the Ottoman Empire joined the war on the side of the Triple Alliance.

2. The war broadened further when German colonies came under attack and the British encouraged Ottoman provinces in the Middle East to revolt.

Wednesday: 

  1. The United States entered the war in 1917 in response to the German use of submarines against passenger ships.
  2.  2. As the war dragged on, governments took control of national economies, censored the news media, and used propaganda to bolster public opinion.

Thursday:

  1. Women entered the workforce in large numbers.
  2. After the war, many lost their jobs to men but gained expanded rights and status. By 1921 women had the vote in Austria, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States.

 

Friday: Test

 

Lesson Plans: Jan.30th   – Feb.3rd  

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Chapter 3: The Constitution

Standards: CPI.1.C.3

            Analyze the rationale for the structure of the U.S. Constitution using a variety of primary and secondary sources=

CPI.1.C.4       Analyze the purpose, organization, authority, and function of each of the three branches of government at the federal and state levels

Chapter Objectives: Students will learn

Articles of Conf. needed to be strengthened. Disagreements arose over representation in Congress, taxation, how to calculate population, trade, and other important matters. Through a series of compromises  a Constitution was formed.

Learn The Constitution has three main parts: a Preamble, seven articles, and twenty-seven amendments.

Three Branches and their powers, and the idea of Separation of Powers

Monday: Review for chapter 2 test

Tuesday: Test and start of Chapter 3

Section 1: The Nation's First Governments
 

Wed.: Learn about:
Section 2: The Road to the Constitution

Thursday.

Section 3: The Structure of Our Constitution

Friday

Section 4: Principles Underlying the Constitution

 

2nd Hour AP American History

Continue chapter 14 and Civil War.

Class will read, take notes and discuss the events that lead to Civil War.

Monday- Friday: Lincolns Inaugural Address, the failure of compromise, rising tensions and the start of war

At Fort Sumnter, the North and South Strategy and How the war proceeded  and the role of Emancipation proclamation and How modern Culture reflects the attitude towards the war still to this day.

3rd Hour American History

Winning Over Hearts and Minds: Analyzing WWII Propaganda Posters

Propaganda played a key part in the United States’ war effort. Although much more subtle, propaganda was as much a weapon of the war as manpower and ammunition. In addition to the radio broadcasts, movies, and comic books, over 200,000 poster designs were produced during WWII by the Office of War Information (OWI), The Treasury Department, branches of the armed force, and recruitment bureaus. These groups used many propaganda types (fear, bandwagon, etc.) and many themes (conservation, recruitment, etc.) to win over the hearts and minds of Americans.

Objective:

By examining propaganda posters from WWII students will increase their knowledge of propaganda tools and develop an understanding of the specific goals and strategies used by the U.S. government and OWI during WWII.

Standards:

History Thinking Standard 2—the student comprehends a variety of historical sources and appreciates historical perspectives as revealed through the arts.

Content Era 8 (1929-1945) Standard 3C—the student understands the effects of the war at home.

Monday-Friday We will examine each of the types of propaganda

Poster One—(Bandwagon): The poster encourages everyone join the war effort-to build arms for victory.

Poster Two—(Fear): The poster shows children in the shadow of the Nazis. If you do not buy war bonds-the Nazis will come for your children (fear).

Poster Three—Euphemism and Fear: The poster shows a sailor dead on the beach-but his death is called a “loss.” The poster also uses fear as a motivator for not speaking out of turn.

Poster Four—Glittering Generalities: The poster shows a women canning food and supporting rationing. It is “patriotic” to do these things (it is a glittering generality because patriotic means different things to different people).

Poster Five—Transfer: The poster shows men fighting in the American Revolution and WWII. If you believe that the Revolutionary War was necessary (for liberty) then of course you should fight in this war (for liberty). The poster transfers the importance of and reason for the American Revolution to WWII.

Poster Six—Testimonial: The poster shows Santa telling everyone to buy war bonds. There are few more recognizable images then Santa. Children and adults would have recognized the image.

 

 

 

 

4th and 6th Hour Pre AP World History:

Chapter Overviews

An assassination in the Balkans sparked the outbreak of World War I. Millions died during the war, which also led to a revolution and Communist rule in Russia. The war settlements redrew the map of Europe and imposed heavy penalties on Germany.

Section 1 The Road to World War I 
Competition over trade and colonies led to the formation of two rival European alliances—the Triple Entente of Great Britain, France, and Russia; and the Triple Alliance, consisting of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy. Austria-Hungary, as well as numerous other European governments, confronted challenges from minorities who wished to establish their own national states. Strikes and violent actions by Socialist labor movements also threatened European governments. Many European states responded with increasing militarism and nationalism. The assassination of the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary by a Bosnian Serb militant set off a chain of diplomatic and military decisions that led all of the great powers of Europe into World War I.

Lesson Plans: Jan.23rd   – 27th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Civic and Political Institutions

Content Standard 1: Students will analyze the structure and functions of various types of government.

Analyze the establishment and purposes of government              CCRA.R.1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10

1st Period:  Civics

Chapter 2: Roots of American Democracy 
"The Articles of Confederacy"

Main Objectives
In this chapter students:

  1. read about the growth of individual rights and democracy from the Magna Carta through the Articles of Confederation.
  2. Throughout history men and women have recorded their ideas on government in essays, treatises, and laws.
  3.  Although the Articles government lasted only a short time, it was an important first step as thirteen states became one nation.

Instructional Objectives and Goals

  1. The learner will be able to read a primary source for factual information.
  2. The learner will be able to present information about the Articles of Information from the point of view of an eighteenth century reporter.
  3. Learn of our heritage, English colonies, Society and Birth of a Nation. (Democracy- Republic)

  Methods and assessments: Students will learn the sources of our ideas of Government and the early formation.  We will be using lecture notes, work sheets, videos and discussion.   assessments: test, discussion and essays.

Monday-  Section 1. Page 32 Our Heritage- Key terms Enlightenment, Monarch, Legislatures, Common Law, precedent and social contract and the role of self governing colonies.

Tuesday- pg.   38 How the self ruling colonies developed. How the people wanted even more self government.

Wednesday- Pg. 44 Learn  the development of early American economies and the development of the unique American Idenity.

 

Thursday: Pg 50 Indepth look at the Declaration of Independence and along the development of our system of government.  Review for test Friday:

 

Test: Friday

 

           

2nd Hour AP US History

Will finish Chapter 13 and test on Tuesday and introduce chapter 14

Main Themes:   Chapter 14: The Civil War  American History: Standards: WC-18 AH-6

Objectives: 11. Students will learn the following.

 

Civil War:

1.Social, political, and economic effects of war in the North, South, and West

2.Two societies at war: mobilization, resources, and internal dissent Military strategies and foreign diplomacy

3. Emancipation and the role of African Americans in the war

Methods and assessments: Students will learn the sources of our ideas of Government and the early formation.  We will be using lecture notes, work sheets, videos and discussion.   assessments: test, discussion and essays.

Monday-  Introduction of Civil War AP video series on Civil War.

Tuesday-    Test Chapter 13.

Wed.- How America split along Economic, political, religious and social lines.

Thursday: How the war developed and the ending of war, Lincoln using Emancipation to make it a war on slavery.

Friday:  Test

3rd Hour American History:

Legislating Neutrality, 1934–1939

Main themes of the end World War II:   Students will learn the following themes to better understand WWII.

The Home Front    1.During the War Wartime mobilization of the economy Urban migration and demographic changes

2. Civil liberties and civil rights during wartime War

3. Women, work, and family during the war Civil liberties and civil rights during wartime War and regional development

4. Expansion of government power and government Propaganda

Methods and assessments: Students will learn the sources of our ideas of Government and the early formation.  We will be using lecture notes, work sheets, videos and discussion.   assessments: test, discussion and essays.

Monday: Handout how America had to sacrifice for the war effort and how our economic engine was a pivotal part of the war.

Tuesday: Handout on the Japanese Interment and loss of Civil Liberties.

Wednesday: Handout on the expanding roles of women and how it lead to more freedoms.

Thursday: Role propaganda played in the war. Review for test

Friday: Test

 

4th and 6th Hour World History

Standards:WH- 5 Imperialism Overview:

  1.  In this lesson students will learn about the period of Imperialism that began in the nineteenth century and continued up until World War I.
  2.  This lesson serves as an introduction to Imperialism and Europe’s quest to carve up and Asia.
  3. The lesson will focus on teaching students the motives for new imperialism: economic interests, political and military interests, humanitarian and religious goals, and Social Darwinism.

 

Objectives:

1. Students will understand Imperialism was a result of the Industrial Revolution by examining motives for Imperialism (WHII.8d)

 2. Students will evaluate the impact of European economic and military power on Asia and Africa through analysis of various forms of imperial control (WHII.8e)

3. Students will investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures to understand the immediate effects of Imperialism (NCSS II.e)

4. Students will work in groups to complete the lesson’s activities while developing social and cooperative learning skills

 

Monday:-The attitude of Germany, France and England and the effect of industrial Revolution.

Tuesday:  Rise of Imperialism to the Pacific: Asia  - China

The Open Door Policy towards China

Wed.- The opening of Japan

Thursday- The American entrance into Asia

 

Lesson Plans: Jan.16th  – 20th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

Civic and Political Institutions

Content Standard 1: Students will analyze the structure and functions of various types of government.

Analyze the establishment and purposes of government              CCRA.R.1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10

1st Period:  Civics

This week will review Chapter 1 and prepare for test

Objective: Chapter 1.

Students will be:

1.  Introduction to course and material;   Class rules/ etiquette;

2. What will be covered;   

3. General Civics questions… What is civics…  Why is it important;

 

Monday-  Review last weeks Chapter 1 material on Citizenship . Hand out review for test on Wed.

Tuesday-  Continue test review;

Wednesday-  Test on Chapter 1.

 

Chapter 2 Civics  Thursday and Friday Students will learn the sources of our ideas of Government and the early formation.  We will be using lecture notes, work sheets, videos and discussion.

English settlers brought the traditions of representative government with them to the New World.

By 1760 the thirteen colonies had gained valuable experience in self-government. However, Britain's new policies and the French and Indian War created tension between the colonies and Great Britain.

Each of the states wrote its own state constitution. 1777 the Articles of Confederation. By 1787 Constitutional convention.

 

           

2nd Hour AP US History

Main Themes:   Chapter 13: The Impending Crisis  American History: Standards: WC-18 AH-6

Objectives:

o   Describe how annexation of western territories intensify the conflict over slavery and lead to a deeper division between North and South

o   Explain the different compromises passed to resolve the conflict of expanding slavery into new territories.

o   Explain the major arguments for and against slavery and its expansion.

o   Summarize Manifest Destiny and its influence on American culture

 

Monday-  Test review.  Handout on Chapter 13.

Tuesday-    Friday  Class will read, take notes and discuss the events that lead to Civil War.

The Compromise of 1850- The Adding of New Territory and wit it the rise of the Slavery issue.

Continue with the issues of:  Kansas- Nebraska Controversy- Bleeding Kansas-Free Soil- Prop Slavery

1850 Election and Lincoln

 

3rd Hour American History:

Legislating Neutrality, 1934–1939

Main themes of World War II:   Students will learn the following themes to better understand WWII.

  • The initial American strategies for fighting the European and Pacific fronts, and the military engagements that characterized the first half of the war
  • The profound effect of World War II on the American economy, and the attempts by the Roosevelt administration to stabilize the wartime economic boom
  • The impact of the war experience on organized labor and minorities at home
  • The development of advanced technologies during the war and their impact on the course of the conflict
  • The events leading to Allied victory in Germany and Japan, culminating in the fall of Berlin and President Truman's decision to use the Atomic Bomb

A thorough study of Chapter Twenty-six should enable the student to understand the following:

 

Monday:    The critical importance of the vast productive capacity of the United States in defeating of the Axis

Tuesday:  1.The effects of American participation in the war on the Depression and on New Deal reform  

2.The changes that the wartime involvement brought for women, labor, and racial and ethnic minorities

Wednesday: The contributions of the United States military to victory in North Africa and Europe

Thursday: The contributions of the United States military to victory in the Pacific

Friday:   The historical disagreement over President Truman's decision to drop the atomic bomb

 

 

4th and 6th Hour World History

Standards:WH- 5 The results of the Napoleonic Wars and rise of Nationalism, imperialism, and Militarism.

Objective: Learning the role of the State and Individual rights

Lesson Goals: Students will learn of the role of the state and how it will either be the servant of the people or its master.

Assessments:  The goals will be assessed with a multiple choice test and essay which will require the students to demonstrate their knowledge of the subject.

Monday- Read and discuss the proper role of Government

Tuesday- What are the individual rights that are the product of society and how they are protected. Or subverted/

Wed.- How the state protects these rights, and how the individual can use them in society.

Thursday- Review and do an outline for essay part of test

Friday- Test.

 

Lesson Plans: Dec. 5th- 9th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Objective: Chapter 14

Government Revenue And Spending

14.1        How Taxes Work                                              Section 1 Assessment    p.419

14.2        Federal Taxes                                                    Section 2 Assessment    p.427

14.3        Federal Government Spending                 Section 3 Asssessment  p.433

14.4        State and Local Taxes and Spending        Section 4 Assessment    p.439

Chapter 14 Assessment                p.442Students: Will learn how our financial how Government gets revenue.

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

Chapter 14

Government Revenue And Spending

     Monday:  14.1

How Taxes Work

Section 1 Assessment

p.419

       Tuesday: 14.2

Federal Taxes

Section 2 Assessment

p.427

Wed.     14.3

Federal Government Spending

Section 3 Asssessment

p.433

Thursday  14.4

State and Local Taxes and Spending

Section 4 Assessment

p.439

 

Friday: Test

 

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Main themes of Chapter 8: Main Themes

          Reading:  Chapter 10 and guided reading handouts.

 Main themes of Chapter Ten:

  • The nature of the rapid immigration and urban growth between 1820 and 1840, and its effect on the nation's economic, social, and political systems
  • The pronounced effect of the transportation and communications revolutions of the 1820s and 1830s on the American economy
  • The transformation in women's social and economic roles as a consequence of the factory system
  • The social changes wrought by America's economic revolution in the fields of public leisure and northern agriculture

 

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930>

Era7.2.USH.5  Examine reasons for and effects of social, economic, political, and cultural changes during the 1920s(e.g., Harlem Renaissance, Lost Generation, prohibition, Stock Market, medical)

Monday:    Lesson 1 – Measuring the Great Depression 

Tuesday:    Lesson 2 – What Do People Say Caused the Great Depression? 

Wed:           Lesson 3 – What Really Caused the Great Depression?

Thursday:   Lesson 4 – Dealing with the Great Depression

Friday: Test

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

World History : Era6.1.WH.5,6    

Arkansas Standards:

Monday:              Section 1: Colonial Rule in Southeast Asia

Tuesday:              Section 2: Empire Building in Africa

Wed.                     Section 3: British Rule in India

Thursday:            Section 4: Nation Building in Latin America

Friday: Test

 

 

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

Nov. 21st -25th   Lesson Plans

1st Hour Economics

Monday-  Finish work sheet on How the Federal Reserve System works`             

Tuesday- review the work sheet on the Fed.

Wed.- No School

Thursday- No School

Friday-  No School

2nd Hour AP US History

Monday-  Begin study of Chapter 10 American business revolution.

Tuesday-  Review video on Chapter 10 for APUSH students.

Wed.- No School

Thursday- No School

Friday-  No School

 

3rd Hour US History

Monday-  Review the Inventions of 1930’s

Tuesday-  Prep Video on the Great Depression

Wed.- No School

Thursday- No School

Friday-  No School

4th and 6th Hour World History

Monday-  Review section four of Chapter 20.  Social Darwinism

Tuesday-  Video how societies used Social Darwinism to justify their ideology.

Wed.- No School

Thursday- No School

Friday-  No School

 

 

Nov. 14th -18th  Lesson Plans

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

 

1st Hour Economics

Monday-  No School

Tuesday-  No School

Wed.-   Review Test Results from last week

Thursday- Chapter 16 the Federals Reserve System: What it is and How does it work?

Friday-  Video on the role of Federal reserve system in out system.

 

2nd Hour AP US History

Monday-  No School

Tuesday-  No School

Wed.-  Review For Chapter 9 test Jacksonian Age

Thursday- Test on Age of Jackson

Friday-  Introduction to Chapter 10 Economic Revolution

 

3rd Hour US History

Monday-  No School

Tuesday-  No School

Wed.- the Great Depression

Thursday-Causes and results

Friday-  Video on great Depression

4th and 6th Hour World History

Monday-  No School

Tuesday-  No School

Wed.-Chapter 20 The social results of the Industrial Revolution

Thursday-Handout on Each Section Read and discuss the results

Friday-  Finish the Class Work of Thursday.

 

 

Lesson Plans: Oct. 31st –Nov. 4th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics  Chapter 17

Objective: This week students will be review the aspects of International Trade

Methodology: We will use a variety of teaching and learning methods to meet the needs of individual stuents

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 **

Monday- Tuesday: Benefits of International Trade and How Trade Barriers are a hindrance or protection of an industry.

Wed.- How we measure the Value of Trade

Thursday-  Identify international trade deals, especially this year’s election of the TPt agreement.

And will have test Friday.

Friday: Test

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Chapter 8: VARIETIES OF AMERICAN NATIONALISM

http://glencoe.mheducation.com/olcweb/styles/shared/spacer.gifMain themes of Chapter Eight:

  • The effects of postwar expansion and continued economic growth in shaping the nation during the "era of good feelings"

The rise of sectional controversy arising from slavery, and the early attempts by Henry Clay and others to prevent strife through the Missouri Compromise

The many prominent decisions of the Marshall Court during the "era of good feelings," and their role in promoting American nationalism, federal supremacy and Native American tribal sovereignty

The development of the "Monroe Doctrine" and its application in further fostering American nationalism

The end of the "era of good feelings" and the rise of America's "second party system"

A thorough study of Chapter Eight should enable the student to understand the following:

  • The effects of the War of 1812 on banking, shipping, farming, industry, and transportation

 

  • The character of westward expansion into the Old Southwest and Old Northwest, and the development of the fur trade in the far West

The "era of good feelings" as a transitional period between two party systems

The causes of the Panic of 1819, the first serious economic crisis in America's history

The disagreements between North and South over the admission of Missouri to the Union, and the tenets of the subsequent Missouri Compromise fashioned by Henry Clay

The ways in which the status of the federal judiciary was changed by the Marshall Court, and the impact of the Court's decisions on the legal status of federal and state governments, business, and Native American tribes

The origins of the "Monroe Doctrine" of 1823, and its impact on international relations at the time

The controversy surrounding the election of 1824 and the alleged "corrupt bargain" between John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay

The frustrations experienced by John Quincy Adams during his term as president, including congressional intransigence and the "tariff of abominations"

The reasons why Andrew Jackson was elected in 1828, and the significance of his victory

 

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930>

Era7.2.USH.5  Examine reasons for and effects of social, economic, political, and cultural changes during the 1920s(e.g., Harlem Renaissance, Lost Generation, prohibition, Stock Market, medical)

This week we will focus on the The Stock Market Crash of 1929 and Its leading to the Great Depression/

Monday- Thursday: Handout and guided reading on the Presidency of Hoover, starting in 1928 and the coming Crisis.

Thursday: Review of issues of the Market Crash and the Great Depression.

Friday: Test.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

World History : Chapter  19

Arkansas Standards:

 Era6.1.WH.4     

As you read this chapter, look for the key events of the  Industrialization and Nationalism, 1800–1870

Main theme: The Industrial Revolution and a wave of liberal nationalist revolutions transformed Europe during the nineteenth century. A weakened old order gave way, and a number of unified European states emerged. Canada gained its independence, and the northern and southern United States reunited after a bloody civil war.

Student Objectives: At the end of chapter Students will be able to recognize how each of the following lead to the Modern world as we now have, and how Nationalism is once again being shaped by world events.

Monday:  Section 1 The Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution had a tremendous social impact in Europe. Cities grew quickly, and an industrial middle class emerged. With wretched working conditions. These conditions gave rise to socialism, a movement aimed at improving working conditions through government control of the means of production.

Tuesday: Section 2 Reaction and Revolution
After the defeat of Napoleon, European leaders met at the Congress of Vienna to restore the old order and establish stable borders. Great Britain, Russia, Prussia, and Austria met regularly to maintain the conservative order. Meanwhile, liberalism and nationalism—two philosophies that opposed the old order—were on the rise. Many liberals were middle-class men who wanted a constitution and a share in the voting rights enjoyed by landowners. Liberals tended to be nationalists as well. In 1830, France's upper middle class overthrew the king and installed a constitutional monarchy. Belgium broke free of Dutch control. Revolts in Poland and Italy failed. Economic crisis in 1848 brought a revolt of the French working classes. This time, a Second Republic was formed, under the leadership of Napoleon's nephew, Louis-Napoleon. Revolts followed in Germany and the Austrian Empire. In each case the old order was restored.

Wednesday:  Section 3 National Unification and the National State
Unification occurred at different times and in different forms throughout Europe and in North America. The Crimean War destroyed the Concert of Europe. A defeated Russia retreated from European affairs, and Austria was isolated. Italian and German nationalists exploited Austria's isolation. Both gained important territory in the Austro-Prussian War and the Franco-Prussian War, and a unified Germany and Italy emerged. Growing prosperity and expanded voting rights helped Great Britain avoid revolution in 1848. In 1852, the French voted to restore their empire. Louis-Napoleon became the authoritarian Napoleon III and ruled until France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. Austria granted Hungarians the right to govern their own domestic affairs. In Russia, Czar Alexander II freed the serfs and instituted other reforms. When a radical assassinated him, his son, Alexander III, reverted to repressive rule. The United States endured a costly civil war to settle the conflict over slavery between the Northern and Southern states. After two short rebellions, Canada won its independence from Great Britain.

Thursday: Section 4 Culture: Romanticism and Realism
At the end off the eighteenth century, a new intellectual movement known as romanticism emerged as a reaction to the ideas of the Enlightenment. Romantics emphasized feelings, emotion, and imagination as sources of knowing. Many were passionately interested in the past. They developed a neo-Gothic style in architecture, and created literature, art, and music that worshiped nature and was critical of science and industry. Meanwhile, the Scientific Revolution revived interest in science. The new age of science produced important ideas, such as Louis Pasteur's germ theory of disease and Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection. The influence of the scientific outlook was readily apparent in the work of the realist novelists and artists, who depicted everyday life, including the lives of the poor, in realistic, and unromantic, detail.

 

 

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

Lesson Plans: Oct. 24th - 28th  

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics  Chapter 9 on Labor and will be teaching out to outline information for studying.

Stadards: Personal Financial Managementontent Standard 8: Students will analyze factors affecting income, wealth, and financial risk.             CCSS ELA-Literacy Alignment               C3 Alignment

PFM.8.E.1

Students: will Analyze the impact of education, training, and other factors on productivity and income potential.  (e.g., interpersonal skills, workforce readiness skills, ethics)    CCRA.R.1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 10

Also, how all this affects the labor force.

Main Idea: The value of your labor depends on the demand for what you do and the supply of other people able to do the same thing. You have to figure out what you do best and to create a plan to get a job that suits your talents. Consider the demand for the job, the training needed, and the supply of people capable of performing it.

Students will learn the Demand for Labor Wages reflect productivity—value of product produced in set time    Producer’s demand for labor is a derived demand          — demand based on its contribution to the final product     Workers with higher productivity tend to earn higher wages      Demand curve is downward sloping: lower price means higher demand

Define the different types of  Human Capital

Monday:   How  Unskilled: few skills; include house cleaning, sanitation workers  Semiskilled: some training; include construction, clerical workers

Tuesday:  Section 1 Learn  the outline.  Fill in Template for Section one. Class activity

Wed. and Thursday:   Lean how Skilled: specialized training; include plumbers, electricians

  • Professional: much specialized training; include doctors, lawyers
  • Skilled workers: high demand and productivity, low supply, high wages

Friday: Test

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Main themes of Chapter Seven: Main Themes

Main themes of Chapter 8: Main Themes  Because of  last weeks testing, we will finish Ch. 8

          Reading:  Chapter 8 and guided reading handouts.

            Main Themes:

a.       How postwar expansion shaped the nation during the “era of good feelings.”

b.      How sectionalism and nationalism could exist at the same time in the same country.

c.       How the “era of good feelings” came to and end and a new, two-party system emerged.

Students: How the rise of good feelings would lead to failure to recognize the vast developing of Sectionalism and the problems it would bring.

Each of the following the students will read and analyze the chapter and handouts.

Monday: How the Election of 1824 lead to the Democratic Party founded by Andrew Jackson. Why it was called the Corrupt Bargain and how the US was developing strong sectional differences.

Tuesday: Jackson became President four years later. And era became known as the Age of Jackson.   The secession with Calhoun as its spokesman, and the defence of the Union by Jackson.

Wed.   Review notes and handouts for Test preparation/

Thursday: Review our notes on how to write a main thesis.

Friday: Test

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930>

Era7.2.USH.5  Examine reasons for and effects of social, economic, political, and cultural changes during the 1920s(e.g.,  The presidents of the era,  Stock Market, medical)

 

Monday- The rise of the Auto industry and how it set the stage for American Individual.

Tuesday- Thursday: The Presidency of Harding , Coolidge and Hoover. Students will learn the styles and results of each President.

Thursday:  Oct. 24th Black Tuesday the stock market crash.

Friday: Test.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

World History : Industrial Rev. IN America

Arkansas Standards:

 Era6.1.WH.4      Evaluate the results of the Industrial Rev. and its impact on American Society.

Key Events

As you read the handout material and class lecture and questioning Students will learn how

The industrial Rev. in America lead to the Guilded Age and Wealthy Individuals.

Main Themes: CURRICULUM STANDARDS · US.1 Explain patterns of agricultural and industrial development as they relate to climate, use of natural resources, markets and trade, the growth of major urban areas, and describe the geographic considerations that led to the location of specialized industries such as textiles, automobiles, and steel. (E, G) · US.2Describe the changes in American life that resulted from the inventions and innovations of business leaders and entrepreneurs of the period: Henry Bessemer , George Pullman , Alexander Graham Bell , Andrew Carnegie , Thomas Edison , J.P. Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, Swift and Armour, Cornelius Vanderbilt (C, E) · US.3Analyze the movement of people from rural to urban areas as a result of industrialization. (E, G) · US.4 Describe the rise of trusts and monopolies, their subsequent impact on consumers and workers, and the government’s response, including the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890. (E, P) · US.5Describe working conditions in industries including the use of labor by women and children. (C, E)

Monday: Students will focus on Main Themes 1 and 2

Tuesday: Focus on 3 and 4

Wed.:  Focus on 5

Thursday: Review for  Test

Friday: Test

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: Oct. 17th – 21st

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Objective: Chapter 11  Financial Markets

11.1        Savings and Investment                Section 1 Assessment    p.323

11.2        Investing in a Market Economy  Section 2 Assessment    p.329

11.3        Buying and Selling Stocks              Section 3 Assessment    p.337

11.4        Bonds and Other Financial Instruments Section 4 Assessment    p.343

Students: Will learn how our financial Markets work and how investment works.  Develop the knowledge to give them the tools for learning how to save and invest.

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

Monday- Tuesday: Handout on financial terms and invest ments. We will be reading, discussing and outlining all types of investments. Start with video of how Tulips of Netherlands were the first stock market type of speculation to rise and fall

Wed.- Thursday- How the stock market works, buying and selling and how that compares to to the bond market and other investments. CD. Annuity etc.

And will have test Friday.

Friday: Test

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Main themes of Chapter 8: Main Themes

          Reading:  Chapter 8 and guided reading handouts.

 

            Main Themes:

 

a.       How postwar expansion shaped the nation during the “era of good feelings.”

b.      How sectionalism and nationalism could exist at the same time in the same country.

c.       How the “era of good feelings” came to and end and a new, two-party system emerged.

Students: How the rise of good feelings would lead to failure to recognize the vast developing of Sectionalism and the problems it would bring.

 

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930>

Era7.2.USH.5  Examine reasons for and effects of social, economic, political, and cultural changes during the 1920s(e.g., Harlem Renaissance, Lost Generation, prohibition, Stock Market, medical)

And use the following Vocabulary: To see how America was influenced by WW I and the desire to be rid of foreign immigration and problems of Europe/.

·        speculation

·        Emergency Quota Act

·        National Origins Act

·        prohibition

·        Harlem Renaissance

·        Red Scare

·        Ku Klux Klan

  • 18th Amendment

·        19th Amendment

Monday- Thursday: Use the above Vocabulary in a time of events and how they affected American life.

1920 The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is adopted.   Prohibition begins.

1921 Congress enacts Emergency Quota Act.

 

1922 The boll weevil ruins more than 85 percent of the South’s cotton crop.

 

1924 The stock market begins its spectacular rise.   National Origins Act replaces Emergency Quota Act.

1925  Ku Klux Klan members stage a major march through Washington, D.C.  Scopes trial takes place in Dayton, Tennessee.  1926 Langston Hughes publishes “The Weary Blues.” 1927 Sacco and Vanzetti are executed.  Charles Lindbergh flies across the Atlantic.  1928 Herbert Hoover is elected U.S. president.  1929  The U.S. stock market crashes on "Black Tuesday.”

Thursday: Review at end of lesson and test Friday.

Friday: Test.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

World History : Pages 538- 542

Arkansas Standards:

 Era6.1.WH.5,6  

Key Events

As you read this chapter, look for the key events of the Industrial Revolution.

Rise of Industrial Revolution

Main Themes:  

Students will understand the economic, environmental, and societal effects that each invention had upon the population by viewing  key figures, events, documents, maps, photos, videos, and recordings.

Monday- Thursday:

 Handouts, lecture and videos on the Rise of Industrial  Revolution and compare to American industrial development..

 Review Thursday and test Friday.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

Lesson Plans: Oct. 10th -15th   

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods. Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

 Example: Questions and answer, follow up questions and use the four levels of understanding posted at front of class.

1st  Hour Economics

Due to last week’s interruptions, we will on Monday review the vocabulary words from Chapter 10 and have a test on Tuesday.

Monday:   Review

Tuesday: Handout on all types of loans. We will be reading, discussing and outlining all types of loans.

Wed.-

Thursday- 

Friday: Test

2nd Hour APUSH

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Main themes of Chapter Seven: Main Themes

1. How Americans expressed their cultural independence.

2. The impact of industrialism on the United States and its people.

3. The role that Thomas Jefferson played in shaping the American character.

4. How the American people and their political system responded to the nation's physical expansion.

5. How American ambitions and attitudes came into conflict with British policies and led to the War of 1812.

6. How Americans were able to "win" the war, and the peace that followed.

Monday- Thursday: Students will review and study

Objectives: A thorough study of Chapter Five should enable the student to understand the following:

A thorough study of Chapter Seven should enable the student to understand:

1. Thomas Jefferson's views on education and the role of education in the concept of a "virtuous and enlightened citizenry."

2. The indications of American cultural nationalism that were beginning to emerge during the first two decades of the nineteenth century.

3. The effects of the Revolutionary era on religion, and the changing religious patterns that helped bring on the Second Great Awakening.

4. The evidence noticeable in the first two decades that the nation was not destined to remain the simple, agrarian republic envisioned by the Jeffersonians.

5. The political philosophy of Jefferson, and the extent to which he was able to adhere to his philosophy while president.

6. The Jeffersonian-Federalist struggle over the judiciary--its causes, the main points of conflict, and the importance of the outcome for the future of the nation.

7. President Jefferson's constitutional reservations concerning the Louisiana Purchase, and the significance of his decision to accept the bargain.

8. The reasons for President Jefferson's sponsorship of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the importance of that exploration.

9. The many problems involved in attempting to achieve an understanding of Aaron Burr and his "conspiracy."

10. What Thomas Jefferson and James Madison were attempting to accomplish by "peaceable coercion," and why their efforts were not successful.

11. The numerous explanations of the causes of the War of 1812, and why there is so much disagreement among historians.

12. The problems caused by Tecumseh's attempts at confederation and by the Spanish presence in Florida as Americans surged westward.

13. The state of the nation in 1812, and how the Madison administration waged war against the world's foremost naval power.

14. The extent of the opposition to the American war effort, and the ways in which the New England Federalists attempted to show their objections.

15. The ways in which the skill of the American peace commissioners and the international problems faced by England contributed to a satisfactory--for Americans--peace settlement.

 

3rd Hour US History

Historical Period: Progressive Era to New Era, 1900-1929 Lesson Module Overview: This group of lessons covers the 1920s era in the United States. Multiple aspects of the time period are covered, and the students are able to do engaging and cooperative activities while learning about their history.

Era7.2.USH.5  Examine reasons for and effects of social, economic, political, and cultural changes during the 1920s(e.g., Harlem Renaissance, Lost Generation, prohibition, Stock Market, medical)

Learning Goals:

Objectives:

-Students will learn about what important events occurred in and around the 1920’s.

-Students will become knowledgeable about our past economy, entertainment, and politics.

-Students will understand why the 1920’s were an important time in history.

Student Goals:

-Students will develop a sense of what it was like to live in the 1920’s.

-Students will evaluate past events and decipher what has made a significant impact on the

history of the United States.

Student Learning”

-Students will develop opinions about cause and effect.

-Students will develop opinions about the time period.

-Students will work individually, and with peers to create a finished product.

Monday- What is the Harlem Renaissance? Handout and discussion.

Teusday-  The Lost Generation, the beginning of authors questioning the American Experience

Wed.- The Cultural of Roaring 20’s

Thursday:Black Tuesday and the collapse of the Stock Market

Friday: Test.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Because of the interruptions of last week, we will go back over some of the information.

World History : Pages 538- 542

Arkansas Standards:

 Era6.1.WH.4      Evaluate the roles of the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon.

Key Events

As you read this chapter, look for the key events of the French Revolution and

French Empire.

Main Themes:

• The fall of the Bastille marked the beginning of the French Revolution.

• The Committee of Public Safety began the Reign of Terror.

• Napoleon Bonaparte created the French Empire.

• Allied forces defeated Napoleon at Waterloo.

Objectives:  Learn of The Impact Today

The events that occurred during this time period still impact our lives today.

• The French Revolution became the model for revolution in the modern world.

• The power of nationalism was first experienced during the French Revolution,

and it is still powerful in existing nations and emerging nations today.

• The French Revolution spread the principle

Monday- Thursday:

 Handouts, lecture and videos on the Causes of French Revolution and compare to American.

 Review Thursday and test Friday.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Lesson Plans: Oct. 3rd- 7th  

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Objective: This week students will be review all kinds of Banking methods to obtain money for society.

Monday: 

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

Monday- Tuesday: Handout on all types of loans. We will be reading, discussing and outlining all types of loans.

Wed.- We go in depth on the credit rating and how it works.

Thursday-  Will Review discuss the different types of how we get our money from Banks.

And will have test Friday.

Friday: Test

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Main themes of Chapter Seven: Main Themes

1. How Americans expressed their cultural independence.

2. The impact of industrialism on the United States and its people.

3. The role that Thomas Jefferson played in shaping the American character.

4. How the American people and their political system responded to the nation's physical expansion.

5. How American ambitions and attitudes came into conflict with British policies and led to the War of 1812.

6. How Americans were able to "win" the war, and the peace that followed.

Monday- Thursday: Students will review and study

Objectives: A thorough study of Chapter Five should enable the student to understand the following:

A thorough study of Chapter Seven should enable the student to understand:

1. Thomas Jefferson's views on education and the role of education in the concept of a "virtuous and enlightened citizenry."

2. The indications of American cultural nationalism that were beginning to emerge during the first two decades of the nineteenth century.

3. The effects of the Revolutionary era on religion, and the changing religious patterns that helped bring on the Second Great Awakening.

4. The evidence noticeable in the first two decades that the nation was not destined to remain the simple, agrarian republic envisioned by the Jeffersonians.

5. The political philosophy of Jefferson, and the extent to which he was able to adhere to his philosophy while president.

6. The Jeffersonian-Federalist struggle over the judiciary--its causes, the main points of conflict, and the importance of the outcome for the future of the nation.

7. President Jefferson's constitutional reservations concerning the Louisiana Purchase, and the significance of his decision to accept the bargain.

8. The reasons for President Jefferson's sponsorship of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the importance of that exploration.

9. The many problems involved in attempting to achieve an understanding of Aaron Burr and his "conspiracy."

10. What Thomas Jefferson and James Madison were attempting to accomplish by "peaceable coercion," and why their efforts were not successful.

11. The numerous explanations of the causes of the War of 1812, and why there is so much disagreement among historians.

12. The problems caused by Tecumseh's attempts at confederation and by the Spanish presence in Florida as Americans surged westward.

13. The state of the nation in 1812, and how the Madison administration waged war against the world's foremost naval power.

14. The extent of the opposition to the American war effort, and the ways in which the New England Federalists attempted to show their objections.

15. The ways in which the skill of the American peace commissioners and the international problems faced by England contributed to a satisfactory--for Americans--peace settlement.

 

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930>

Era7.2.USH.5  Examine reasons for and effects of social, economic, political, and cultural changes during the 1920s(e.g., Harlem Renaissance, Lost Generation, prohibition, Stock Market, medical)

 

Monday- Thursday: How the American Enterprise system changed in 1920’s

Thursday: Review of issues of the Free Enterprise System. Review for test.

Friday: Test.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

World History : Pages 538- 542

Arkansas Standards:

 Era6.1.WH.4      Evaluate the roles of the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon.

Key Events

As you read this chapter, look for the key events of the French Revolution and

French Empire.

Main Themes:

• The fall of the Bastille marked the beginning of the French Revolution.

• The Committee of Public Safety began the Reign of Terror.

• Napoleon Bonaparte created the French Empire.

• Allied forces defeated Napoleon at Waterloo.

Objectives:  Learn of The Impact Today

The events that occurred during this time period still impact our lives today.

• The French Revolution became the model for revolution in the modern world.

• The power of nationalism was first experienced during the French Revolution,

and it is still powerful in existing nations and emerging nations today.

• The French Revolution spread the principle

Monday- Thursday:

 Handouts, lecture and videos on the Causes of French Revolution and compare to American.

 Review Thursday and test Friday.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

Lesson Plans Oct. 3rd

 

Take roll-  Take lunch count and send numbers to office.

All handouts for each class are on the table in front in folders.

Collect papers at end of each period, even if not done.

1st hour Economics: Books at back of room

Handouts: Use book to write down facts about each topic after they have read the information.

2nd Hour US History

Handout on Chapter 7 and will have test on Ch. 6 Tuesday

3rd Hour

Handout on American Enterprise System will Use the same economics book used 1st hour.

4th  and 6th Hour Chapter 18 of World History book.

Have them write the term to the definition

5th Hour Conference

7th Hour Cross country –PE   Take them to Gazebo, have PE Walk and the Runners run the course one lap easy. Remind Cross Country meet Tuesday at Lions Club Golf Course.

8th Hour Same as 7th and reminder.

Lesson Plans: Sept. 26th- 30th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Objective: This week students will be review all types of loans, example Home, Car, Student etc and how you build a credit rating. How interest rates rise and lower.

Monday: 

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

Monday- Tuesday: Handout on all types of loans. We will be reading, discussing and outlining all types of loans.

Wed.- We go in depth on the credit rating and how it works.

Thursday-  Learn about how you apply for a loan and how to research the loan process and review for the test on Friday.

Friday: Test

AP American History:

Objective: Continue to work on how to develop a thesis statement for both Essay and DBQ’s.

Students will be given examples and watch short clips on developing a thesis statement

Main themes of Chapter Five:

  • The political strategies employed by the 2nd Continental Congress in declaring their independence from England and uniting the colonies in military endeavor
  • The battle strategies and military contingencies that characterized the three distinct phases of the American War of Independence
  • The attempt by Americans to apply revolutionary republican ideology to the building of the nation and to the remaking of society, and how this application affected such minority groups as African-Americans, Native Americans, and women in the newly independent colonies
  • The problems that remained after, or were created by, the American Revolution and that were faced by the weak national government under the Articles of Confederation

A thorough study of Chapter Five should enable the student to understand the following:

 Monday- Tuesday: Students will review and study

  • The historical debate surrounding the nature of the American Revolution and the reasons for disagreement
  • The defining of American war aims and the importance of Thomas Paine's Common Sense
  • The origins and content of the Declaration of Independence

Wednesdy and Thursday: Students will review and study

  • The three distinct phases of the War for Independence, and its transformation into a new kind of conflict that worked against British military superiority
  • The impact of the Revolution on women, African-Americans, Native Americans, and other minoritie
  • The assumptions and rhetoric of the political philosophy of republicanism
  • The types of governments created by the new states, and the important features in their government
  • The course of diplomacy between Americans both during the War and in the years afterwards during attempts to stand up the new nation

Friday: Students will review and study

  • The features of the Articles of Confederation, and the reasons for its creation
  • The domestic and diplomatic problems faced by the government under the Articles of Confederation, and how they were addressed

 

 

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930>

Objectives: Students will learn the Arkansas’s role in World War I, the results of World War I , the un resolved issues and the Flu epidemic of 1918.

Arkansas Standards: Evaluate social, economic, and political motives for and impact of the involvement of the United States in World War I using multiple primary and secondary sources

Analyze the historical significance of battles, events, and people during WWI

 

Monday: Hand out on Arkansas’s role in WWI.

Tuesday: How the world wide conflict lead to devastating Flu epidemic

Wed.: Learn of the Un resolved issues of WW I

Thursday: Review of issues left by WW I and test Review

Friday: Test.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

World History : Pages 538- 542

Arkansas Standards:

 Era6.1.WH.4      Evaluate the roles of science and technology on the transformation of the first global age by examining multiple sources and perspectives

Main Theme: The Scientific Revolution represented a shift in thinking in a handful of academics in the 16-18th centuries.  This new understanding of the mechanics of the universe, especially Newton’s principles of motion, encouraged many intellectuals as a whole to think about themselves, society, government, and the universe in rational, scientific terms, which helped pave the way to the Enlightenment in the 18th Century.

 

Objectives
1. Students will identify the significant figures of the Scientific Revolution and their contribution to scientificknowledge
2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of scientific thinking
3. Students will identify the scientific method and explain how this represented a revolution in thinking, focusing on paradigm shifts.
4. Students will demonstrate the cultural effects of the Scientific Revolution, especially within the context of the Reformation and how Newtonian’s helped pave the way to the Enlightenment

 

Pre- lecture notes, students will read pages 538- 542

Monday: Review the contributions of Issac Newton and Francis Bacon.

Tuesday and Wed.: How the Scientific Revolution lead to the Enlightenment

Thursday: How the Enlightenment Lead to the American Revolution- Review of Test

Frid: Test

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

Lesson Plans: Sept. 19th- 23rd  

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Monday:  Review Ch. 5  Demand , Supply and Prices Pages 162- 179

Objectives: Students will be able to explain Economic Demand, Supply and Prices in the economy.

  1. Students understand that the equilibrium of Demand and Supply.
  2. How prices serve as signals and incentives for the economy.
  3. And how we as consumers react to the Price System

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

Monday-Tuesday: Handout for over view of the chapter.  Guided reading: 25 Questions and answers.

We will check work and will add notes to the work Sheet.

Wed.- How Dell used Price to beat competition. What incentives did he use? How was he a Pioneer?

How did he use his experience?

Thursday: How has rent controlled been?  How to identify setting price floors?  Rationing and how the Black market works? 

Review for test Friday:

Friday: Test

 

2nd Hour APUSH  Chapter 5

OBJECTIVES

Students Will Be Able To...

1. discuss conflict known as the Boston Massacre; understand tradition of “Colonial neglect”

2. list precursors to Declaration of Independence

3. analyze the Dec. of Indepenence as a rhetorical document

4. explain advantages and disadvantages of Colonists during American Revolution

 

Monday-Tuesday: 1.        Lecture on development of political institutions within English colonies

2.         Lecture on the sequence of events that led to American Revolution

3.         Presentation on the Battle of White Plains and the Battle for New York City

whether the grievances of the American colonies were “ justified”. (CR 1)

4     Class discussion of the “benefits” the Americans gained from being an English

Colony

  1. whether the grievances of the American colonies were “ justified”. (CR 1)

6.      Class discussion of the “benefits” the Americans gained from being an English

colony.

Wednesday- Thursday:

     Analysis of the Declaration of Independence for its philosophy and class discussion

whether the grievances of the American colonies were “ justified”. (CR 1)

·         Class discussion of the “benefits” the Americans gained from being an English

colony.

Thursday and Friday: How to write DBQ

 

·         DBQ essay assigned- 2004 AP-French & Indian War (CR 8)

·         DBQ essay assigned American Revolution 1999; 2005 (CR 8)

·         Exploration and description of the Battle of White Plains 1776.

 

3rd Hour US History

Objective:

1. WWI: Beginnings and Progression and how the following lead to the war:

2. militarism, imperialism, and nationalism

3. Understands the changing role of the United States in world affairs through World War I

 

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930> USH.1 Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic territories on the development of the United States .

Methods: Handout, video and Questions: Below

Monday- Thursday:   Students will be guided by Questions: To answer the following.

  1. Historically, it has been noted that WWI erupted after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (heir apparent to the Austro-Hungarian throne) in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914.
  2. However, historians continue to debate other underlying causes, including changing political and economic situations in major European nations, the Industrial Revolution, and social turmoil.
  3. Whatever, the cause, The World War of 1914-18 - The Great War, as contemporaries called it -- was the first man-made catastrophe of the 20th century.:

4. Investigate and document the main causes of WWI.

5. Describe the factors contributing to the war's stalemate.

6. Assess and reshape events and decisions key to the start and continuation of WWI.

7. Understands the causes and global consequences of World War I

Friday:  Test 

 

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Alert: Because of Class interruptions. We will go back over the Great Teachers and philosophies of Greece.  Also, the Test on Early Greece took two days.

Era 6: Standards WH1,2 and 3.  Ancient Greece  1.         

Objectives:    Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the Ancient Greeks Teachers. Socrates, Aristotle, Plato, Demonthenes,  Milo of Croton etc/

Assessment Methods:  Students will do class reading, guided reading work sheets and Test on Greek Teachers.

Monday and Tuesday: The cultural life of classical Greece  Lecture notes on the following:

                     A.        Rational thought and philosophy

                                     1.        The formation of Greek cultural traditions: philosophy based on human reason

                                     2.        Socrates (470-399 B.C.E.): "An unexamined life is not worth living"

                                                     a.        Encouraged reflection on questions of ethics and morality

                                                     b.        Was condemned to death on charge of corrupting Athenian youths

                                     3.        Plato (430-347 B.C.E.): A zealous disciple of Socrates

                                                     a.        The theory of Forms or Ideas--world of ideal qualities

                                                     b.        This world is imperfect reflection of world of Forms

                                                     c.        His Republic expressed the ideal of philosophical kings

Wed. – Thrusday:

                                     4.        Aristotle (384-322 B.C.E.): Plato's student, but distrusted theory of Forms

                                                     a.        Devised rules of logic to construct powerful arguments

                                                     b.        Philosophers should rely on senses to provide accurate information

                                     5.        Legacy of Greek philosophy

                                                     a.        Intellectual authorities for European philosophers until seventeenth century

                                                     b.        Intellectual inspiration for Christian and Islamic theologians

                     B.        Popular religion and Greek drama

                                     1.        Greek deities: Zeus and scores of subordinate deities

                                     2.        Various types of religious cults; Cult of Dionysus most popular

                                     3.        Drama was performed at annual theatrical festivals

                                                     a.        Great tragedians explored the possibilities and limitations of human action

                                                     b.        Comic drama took delight in lampooning the public figures

                    C.        Hellenistic philosophy and religion

                                     1.        The Hellenistic philosophers: search for personal tranquility

                                                     a.        Epicureans: identified pleasure as the greatest good

                                                     b.        Skeptics: doubted certainty of knowledge, sought equanimity

                                                     c.        Stoics: taught individuals duty to aid others and lead virtuous lives

                                     2.        Religions of salvation spread through trade routes

                                                     a.        Mystery religions promised eternal bliss for believers; like Cult of Osiris

                                                     b.        Speculation about a single, universal god emerged

Test: Friday

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: Sept. 12th- 16th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Monday:  Review Ch. 3  American Enterprise System Page 70-93 Test Tuesday on Ch. 3

Objectives: Students will be able to explain Economic Demand. Focusing on its role in the market economy

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

Monday:  Review Ch. 3  American Enterprise System Page 70-93 Test Tuesday on Ch. 3

Tuesday: Test

Wed.-Friday: Students will read about real world examples of how demand works in the economy.

Wed.- How prices are dependent on Demand.  How it affects the consumer.

Thursday: The role of rising income, usually comes with rise in consumer demand.

Friday: How prices can increase or decrease Consumer demands/

 

Chapter 4: THE EMPIRE IN TRANSITION(Because of missing class room time, we will re look at Chapter 4.

Main themes of Chapter Four:

•             The growing enmity between the British and French in North America, culminating in the Seven Years' War

The consequences of the Seven Years' War in driving further wedges between England and the people of the colonies

The participation of Native Americans in the Seven Years' War and the results of that war for those populations

The policies taken by Parliament in the 1760s and 1770s that served to incite resistance and rebellion in British North America

The varied responses to English policies made by colonial leaders, and the growing cooperation among the thirteen colonies

The outbreak of military hostilities between England and the colonies in Lexington and Concord, and the start of America's War of Independence

 

A thorough study of Chapter Four should enable the student to understand the following:

•             The primary reasons for the growth of the differences between colonial Americans and the British government in the years leading up to the Revolution

 

•             The growing conflict between the English, the French, and the Iroquois Confederacy, culminating in the Seven Years' War

 

•             The three distinct phases of the Seven Years' War, and their implications for the colonies of British North America

 

•             The effects of the war on the American colonists and on the status of the colonies within the British Empire

 

•             The effects of the war on the Native American populations, whether they participated or did not participate

 

•             The options available to the British for dealing with the colonies in 1763, and the reasons for adopting the policies that they chose to implement

 

•             The importance of the series of crises from the Sugar Act through the Coercive Acts, and how each crisis changed colonial attitudes toward the mother country

 

•             The change in American attitudes toward Parliament, the English constitution, and the king resulting from the policies of George Grenville, Charles Townshend, and Lord North

 

•             The meaning and significance of such slogans as "No taxation without representation."

 

•             The significance and accomplishments of the First Continental Congress

 

•             The events of Lexington and Concord and the beginnings of the American Revolution

 

Monday: Handout on Chapter 4- Emphasis of the growing divide between the colonies and England.

Tuesday: Lecture on the coming separation and review the objective for this section. Also, review for test on Chap. 3 for Wed.

Wed. – Test

Thursday – Friday:  Read and discuss the 7 years war.

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930> USH.1 Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic territories on the development of the United States .

Arkansas in The Progressive Era, 1900-1916

 Monday: Using the Arkansas History books. Read and outline the 6 Major geographic regions of Arkansas.

 

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Monday and Tuesday: review and test  on Geography and Culture of Ancient Greece.

Era 6: Standards WH1,2 and 3.  Ancient Greece  1.         

   Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the Ancient Greeks Teachers. Socrates, Aristotle, Plato, Demonthenes,  Milo of Croton etc/

Introduction:  The Greek teachers.

The great teachers of Greece and the variety of Philosophy’s of the era.

Assessment:  Students will do class reading, guided reading work sheets and Test on Greek Teachers.

Monday: Review of Chapter 4  Geography and Culture of Ancient Greece. Will read the answers to last weeks work sheet, and study for test.

Tuesday: Test

 Wed. Classical GreeceTeachers: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle

Thursday:  The different philosophies: Stoics, Epicureans, etc. Review and test Friday on The Great Teachers and Philosophy.

Friday: Test

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds.

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: Sept. 5th(labor Day) Lessons 6th-9th

For all lessons we will use modification for Resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Ch. 3  American Enterprise System Page 70-93

Objectives: Students will be able to explain the American Capitalist system. Focusing on legal rights of property, the profit motive and the role the government in the market economy

EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 ***** 

Methods: We will read, discuss and do guided reading exercises.

  Mon.(No School) – Tuesday: Discuss and analysis the basic American Econ.. system identifying the property rights, profit motive and completion.  The role of prices, in  the

Wed.-Thursday:  Learn and discuss how Consumers use resources, how producers know what to produce and how government even in a free market economy has a role.

Friday: Test

Friday:  Test on Ch. 2

Chapter 4: THE EMPIRE IN TRANSITION

http://highered.mheducation.com/olcweb/styles/shared/spacer.gifMain themes of Chapter Four:

  • The growing enmity between the British and French in North America, culminating in the Seven Years' War

The consequences of the Seven Years' War in driving further wedges between England and the people of the colonies

The participation of Native Americans in the Seven Years' War and the results of that war for those populations

The policies taken by Parliament in the 1760s and 1770s that served to incite resistance and rebellion in British North America

The varied responses to English policies made by colonial leaders, and the growing cooperation among the thirteen colonies

The outbreak of military hostilities between England and the colonies in Lexington and Concord, and the start of America's War of Independence

 

A thorough study of Chapter Four should enable the student to understand the following:

  • The primary reasons for the growth of the differences between colonial Americans and the British government in the years leading up to the Revolution

 

  • The growing conflict between the English, the French, and the Iroquois Confederacy, culminating in the Seven Years' War

 

  • The three distinct phases of the Seven Years' War, and their implications for the colonies of British North America

 

  • The effects of the war on the American colonists and on the status of the colonies within the British Empire

 

  • The effects of the war on the Native American populations, whether they participated or did not participate

 

  • The options available to the British for dealing with the colonies in 1763, and the reasons for adopting the policies that they chose to implement

 

  • The importance of the series of crises from the Sugar Act through the Coercive Acts, and how each crisis changed colonial attitudes toward the mother country

 

  • The change in American attitudes toward Parliament, the English constitution, and the king resulting from the policies of George Grenville, Charles Townshend, and Lord North

 

  • The meaning and significance of such slogans as "No taxation without representation."

 

  • The significance and accomplishments of the First Continental Congress

 

  • The events of Lexington and Concord and the beginnings of the American Revolution

 

Monday: No School

Tuesday: Lecture on the coming separation and review the objective for this section. Also, review for test on Chap. 3 for Wed.

Wed. – Test

Thursday – Friday:  Read and discuss the 7 years war.

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930> USH.1 Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic territories on the development of the United States .

The Progressive Era, 1900-1916 Six major themes we will consider:

 I. Shift from Gilded Age to Progressive Era Reform

II. Five Goals of the Progressive Era Reform Movement

III. Theodore Roosevelt and Republican Progressivism

IV. William Howard Taft, Roosevelt’s protégé outdoes his boss

V. The Election of 1912 – Progressives battle each other VI. Woodrow Wilson’s Progressivism

Monday(No School):

Tuesday:  Finish the time line of events to 1900- to 1908.

Wed. -  Read and study the goals of Progressivism and age of reform. Etc.

Thursday-  Friday:  The Progressive movement got its start and how it influenced American Politics and society.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Era 6: Standards WH1,2 and 3.  Ancient Greece  1.             Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the Ancient Greeks 

Introduction:  Chapter  4The First Greek Civilizations

We learn and analysis of how Greece’s geography affected its development. (Sea and Mountains) introduction Minoan civilization and defeat by the Mycenaean’s. The author then discusses Mycenae, the first Greek state. The development of Greek culture and rise of Alexander the great.

Assessment:  Students will do class reading, guided reading work sheets and Test on Greek Culture.

Monday: No school

Tuesday: The Greek City-States: explanation of what the polis, or Greek city-state, center of Greek life. A discussion on tyranny in the city-states and We will be comparing Sparta and Athens.

 Wed. Classical Greece:  Persia challenged Greece and how the Athenians won against a much larger Persian force. He then continues by explaining how the Athenian empire grew and. Great Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta and study classical Athens, including the economy, family, and role of women.

Thursday: The Culture of Classical Greece: Discus the religion of Greece and the of the great teachers and all the Greek philosophy.  Drama, tragedies and comedies. Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and the classical ideals demonstrated in Greek art.

Friday: Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms  Macedonians developed and became a threat to the Greeks. The author introduces Alexander the Great and describes his conquests and legacy. Greek culture was spread.(Conquest) The Hellenistic culture included architecture, sculpture, literature, science, and philosophy.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: 8-29- Sept. 2nd, 2016

For all lessons we will use modification for resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Ch. 2 Command Economies: Main features, socialism vs communism, examples of CE and advantages and distadvantages. EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 ***** 

  Mon. – Tuesday: Discuss and analysis the basic Economic terms. And look at the various types of Questions that are answered by economic systems.

Wed.-Thursday:  Learn and discuss the Fundamental of Market Economies.  Using the guide of Private Property, Markets, limits of Government, voluntary exchange and Completion(the consumer)

Friday:  Test on Ch. 2

2nd Hour AP American Chapter 3:

After the turmoil of the late seventeenth century had subsided, it became evident that the English-American colonies and the colonists who populated them were beginning to develop characteristics that were distinctly "American." Although still essentially transplanted English subjects and still greatly influenced by European ideas and institutions, the colonists were also diverse, aggressive, and as concerned with their own success as with that of the empire of which they were part. New sources of wealth and new patterns of trade shaped the growth of the colonies, and new immigrants, not always from England, added a dimension unknown in the mother country. Although differences in geography, economy, and population gave each colony its own particular character and problems, there remained many common concerns--not the least of which was how to deal with, or avoid dealing with, British mercantile restrictions. In short, between 1700 and 1750, Britain's American colonies began to show signs of being both English and American; they were indeed "different," .


Main Themes

1. How the colonial population grew and diversified.

2. How the colonial economy expanded to meet the needs of this rapidly growing population.

3. The emergence of a particularly American "mind and spirit.

Objectives

A thorough study of Chapter Three should enable the student to understand:

1. The disagreement among historians concerning the origins of slavery.

2. The sources of colonial labor, including indentured servants, women, and imported Africans.

3. Immigration patterns and their effect on colonial development.

4. The ways in which factors of soil and climate determined the commercial and agricultural development of the colonies, despite crown attempts to influence production.

5. The emergence of the plantation system, and its impact on southern society.

6. The New England witchcraft episode as a reflection of the Puritan society.

7. The reasons for the appearance of a variety of religious sects in the colonies, and the effect of the Great Awakening on the colonists.

8. The beginnings of colonial industry and commerce, and the early attempts at regulation by Parliament.

9. The ways in which colonial literature, education, science, law, and justice were diverging from their English antecedents.

Monday-Friday: We will be exploring and analyzing the Main themes and objectives.

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930> USH.1 Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic territories on the development of the United States .

Looking at Historical Characters of Arkansas History during this time period. Bass Reeves, Belle Starr and Judge Issac Parker.

Monday:-Tuesday:  Class reading and discussion of the Historical accounts of the above individuals.

Take notes and develop a sense for America at turn of Century.

Wed. -  Study the Rise of Teddy Roosevelt and how his vision of America. Being An American.

Thursday-  Friday:  How the Progressive movement got its start and how it influenced American Politics and society.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Era 6: Standards WH1,2 and 3.  Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770                  1.          Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the first global age. 

Introduction:  Chapter 3 describes the challenges ancient Indian and Chinese rulers faced as they sought to build large empires. It also discusses the emergence of major religions and philosophies.  Within a few centuries of the death of Siddhartha Gautama, known to followers as the Buddha, the study and practice of Buddhism spread throughout Asia. Today Buddhism is the fourth largest religion in the world. By examining developments among Buddhist adherents soon after the Buddha's death, students can learn how Buddhism spread and changed.

Instructional Objectives

Students will be able to describe the history, the development of Indian History and spread of Buddhism throughout Asia.

Students will be able to analyze facts that support the spread of Buddhism and list the evidence historians might look for that would support their hypothesis on the spread of Buddhism.

Learn of the Culture of the Chinese Civilzations and Its development.

Monday –  Will be class study of the Civilizations of India and their accomplishment. And review for test.

Tuesday-(Test on Ch. 2 Tuesday)

Wed.-Friday: We will discover how the inventions in India and China influenced the world of today.

·          Section 1 Early Civilization in India
As early as 3000 B.C., an advanced civilization known as the Indus. Two enduring features of Indian civilization, Hinduism and the caste system. The Sanskrit written language. In the sixth century B.C., a doctrine called Buddhism developed as a rival to Hinduism. The founder, Siddhartha Gautama, known as the Buddha,. Instead, he preached his Four Noble Truths, emphasizing the need to search for wisdom as a way to end suffering and achieve nirvana.

·          Section 2 New Empires in India
The Kushan Kingdom the Kushans prospered due to trade along the 4,000-mile Silk Road that passed through their territory. After Persian invaders toppled the Kushans, the Guptas established a new Indian dynasty in A.D. 320. early Indian civilization made lasting contributions. Architecture and Indians also advanced the study of astronomy and mathematics. Their advances were later adopted in the Arab world and in Europe.

·          Section 3 Early Chinese Civilizations
Historians traditionally consider the founding of the Xia dynasty over 4000 years ago as the beginning of Chinese civilization.  replaced by the Shang dynasty, , the Zhou, claimed to rule by a Mandate of Heaven. Under the Zhou, irrigation and improved farming methods led to increased food production.  In the Zhou dynasty, three major Chinese philosophies developed. Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism focused on the immediate world and offered alternative paths to an orderly society.

·          Section 4 Rise and Fall of Chinese Empires
From about 400 to 200 B.C., powerful Chinese states engaged in bloody civil war. the Han dynasty China became more stable. The Hans adopted Confucianism, rather than Legalism, as their guiding principle. Yet they built on many of Qin's bureaucratic innovations. New technologies and inventions such as paper and steel brought prosperity. Advances in shipbuilding led to overseas trade. However, many free peasants did not share in the prosperity and were forced to sell their land and become tenant farmers. Peasant uprisings, along with political intrigue, helped bring about the end of the dynasty.

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: 8-22- 26, 2016

For all lessons we will use modification for resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

Ch. 2 Command Economies: Main features, socialism vs communism, examples of CE and advantages and distadvantages. EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 *****    Mon. – Review for Test Tuesday. The basic economic terms.

Tuesday- Test  Multiple Choice and essay.

Wed.-Thursday:  Ch. 2 Study the role of the Government in Command Economy, Karl Marx the father of Communism and drawing comparisons of Socialism and communism.  The role of the Individual in CE.

Friday:  Market Economies  How it works, main features, the circular flow of Ec. Activity and the Adv. And Disadvantages .

 

2nd Hour AP American History

Chapter 1: The Meeting of Cultures
Objectives

A thorough study of Chapter One should enable the student to understand:

1. The history of the Native Americans before the arrival of Europeans.  2. What the New World was like at the time of Christopher Columbus.  3. The ways in which the peoples of the New and Old Worlds affected each other when their
societies came in contact in the late fifteenth century.  4. The changes taking place in western Europe that resulted in widespread interest in colonization. 5. The colonial policies of each nation involved, and the effect each had on the future of the
Americas.  6. The reasons for the rivalry between Spain and England during the sixteenth and seventeenth
centuries, and the impact of that rivalry on international affairs.  7. The African cultures from which black slaves were taken and the early development of slavery.  8. The role of religion in European efforts to colonize the New World.  9. The ways in which the experiences of the English in Ireland influenced their efforts to colonize
North America.  10. The first efforts of the English to establish a colony and the reasons for their failure.

Mon. – Thursday: will discuss and analysis each theme, with a summary and practice developing a thesis statement on Friday:

Main Themes

Monday: That the colonization of the Americas was a collision of cultures—the European and the
Native American—that had been developing along completely different lines for thousands
of years.

Tuesday: How a variety of ambitions and impulses moved individuals and nations to colonize the
New World.

Wed.  The way the motives of the colonizers and their experiences prior to immigrating shaped
their attitudes toward Native American cultures.

Thursday:  How these same motives and experiences helped determine the sociopolitical
arrangements in the new colonies.

 

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern    America 1890-1930> USH.1 Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic effects of acquiring new territories on the development of the United States (e.g., Spanish-American War, annexation of Hawaii)

Monday: Review of the 1890- 1899. And test on Tuesday

Tuesday: Test

Wed. -  A Closer study of the Spanish American War and the rise of American World Empire.

Thursday-  Friday: How the political control of the Philippines gave the blue print for American expansion. How American Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt pushed for foreign expansion.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Era 6: Standards WH1,2 and 3.  Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770                  1.          Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the first global age. 

Model Lesson: Early River Valley Civilizations – “History Waits Upon Geography”

Main Theme:  This model lesson focuses on how geography impacted the development of major river valley civilizations.  Students will analyze the impact of geography on agricultural practices, economic activity, political structures, religious beliefs, and other aspects of culture.

Focus Questions: Also Monday will address class rubrics for writing.

Monday- Thursday: We will identify the the importance of each of these essential questions:

  • What are the defining characteristics of civilization?
  • Why did ancient peoples settle in river valleys?  What resources did the rivers provide?
  • How did geography influence the development of agriculture in river valleys?
  • How did geography influence economic activities such as trade?
  • How did geography influence the political structure of ancient governments?
  • How did geography influence the religious beliefs of ancient peoples?

Friday- Test

Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Identify and describe major physical characteristics* of regions in Africa, Asia, and the Southwest Pacific.
  • Identify and compare the rise of early agricultural river valley civilizations in Africa and Asia. (Individuals, Society, and Culture)
  • Identify and explain the importance of the early cultural hearths* in the Nile River Valley, Mesopotamia, the Indus River Valley and the Huang River Valley. (Individuals, Society and Culture)

 

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans: 8-15- 19, 2016

For all lessons we will use modification for resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

1st  Hour Economics

What is economics? EF.1LE.1-2 and 3 This week we will define and address the problem of Sacricity, with the definition of Cost/Benefit Analysis.

*****    Mon. – Class Rules and Introduction to Economics

Tuesday- Wed.-  Explain the role scarcity plays in making choices: individuals, businesses, government: Students will show an understanding of scarcity and choices by giving examples of situations where scarcity and choices had been made.  1.Define scarcity 2.Give personal examples of scarcity in their lives 3.Give choices made because of scarcity

Thursday- Friday: Describe the use of cost/benefit analysis in making choices: Students will analyze scarcity and choices by examining the five steps of cost/benefit analysis 1. Define cost/benefit analysis 2.Use cost/benefit analysis in making a choice

 

2nd Hour AP American History

Transatlantic Encounters and Colonial Beginnings    Magna Carta: Cornerstone of the U.S. Constitution    Magna Carta served to lay the foundation for the evolution of parliamentary government and subsequent declarations of rights in Great Britain and the United States. In attempting to establish checks on the king's powers, this document asserted the right of "due process" of law.

Images of the New World  How did the English picture the native peoples of America during the early phases of colonization of North America? This lesson plan enables students to interact with written and visual accounts of this critical formative period at the end of the 16th century, when the English view of the New World was being formulated, with consequences that we are still seeing today.

Standards: Mig 2.0 Geo. 1.0 Review of migration patterns to new world and geographic challenges.Key Concept 1.1

Mon.- Frid. – Key concept 1.3 WXT 2 and 3. , with WOR 1.0 

Explain patterns of exchange, tech innovations  and cultural interactions.

Each of the following will be taught using lecture and handouts.

Mon. – The tech advantages of Spaniards over Aztec, and Inca.

Tues.- The exploration and discovery of new Lands to North . Arrival of French and English

Wed.  The Columbian exchange. What was? What changes it Brought.

Thursday- Lesson on joint stock companies and development of markets in Am.

Friday- Essay on Early American- Development of Thesis Statement.

3rd Hour US History

Strand Content Standard  Era 7: Emergence of Modern

Monday: Class rules and procedures.

America 1890-1930> USH.1 Analyze social, economic, political, and geographic effects of acquiring new territories on the development of the United States (e.g., Spanish-American War, annexation of Hawaii)

Tuesday: 1. Students will evaluate the territorial expansion and foreign policy of the United States between 1890 and 1930.

Wed. 2. Students will evaluate social, economic, and political changes in the United States between 1890 and 1930.

Thursday:  The start of progressive Era.  And the start of the American Empire.

The Rise of Teddy Roosevelt.

Friday: How the political control of the Philippines gave the blue print for American expansion.

 

4th and 6th Pre AP World History

Era 6: Standards WH1,2 and 3.  Emergence of First Global Age 1450-1770                  1.          Students will analyze the transformations and innovations of the first global age. 

Monday: Class Room Rules and Procedures

Tuesday-Wed.

 Era6.1.WH.1  Analyze the motivations that led to the exploration and the expansion of empires. Students will study and analyze the following Social Sciences Systems.

•             Belief systems  •              Economic   •       Political

 Thursday- Friday: Study the rise of Civilizations, using the following Social Studies guidelines.

 Era6.1.WH.2      Analyze the social, economic, political, and geographic transformations of regional connections into global trade networks   Era6.1.WH.3     Analyze the social, economic, political, and geographic effects of the expansion of empires in the eastern and western hemispheres from 1450-1770

 

7th Hour PE

MC.1.PEL.5         Differentiate between anaerobic and aerobic activities for improvement in endurance

Monday: Class room rules and procedures

Monday- Friday: We will learn between anaerobic and aerobic activities.

Anaerobic- short burst of energy lasting 4-40 seconds. 

Types weights, sprints, Zumba, circuit training. Sports: such as football and basketball

Aerobic – activities last 3 or more minutes, with adequate oxygen.

Walking and any exercise that allows conversation while, doing the exercise.

Lesson Plans: 8-15- 19, 2016

For all lessons we will use modification for resource and 504. And will meet curriculum standards for each class. And use a variety of assessments and teaching methods.

e exercise.

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